Women's rights, Saudi style

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In Saudi Arabia, a small step forward in women's rights doesn't even begin to overcome the restricted reality of women's life in this oil rich backward kingdom.   
In a major breakthrough--for them--
Women in Saudi Arabia can now stay in a hotel or a furnished apartment without a male guardian, according to a government decision that comes as the country faces increasing criticism for its severe restrictions on women.

The daily Al-Watan, which is deemed close to the Saudi government, reported Monday that the ministry issued a circular to hotels asking them to accept lone women - as long as their information is sent to a local police station.


However this slight advance won't help a Saudi woman sitting in jail
because her family doesn't like her husband. 
Under Saudi law, a woman needs the permission of her family to marry.

Saudi lawyer Abdul-Rahman al-Lahem, who used to represent the couple, said local interpretations of Islamic law hold that relatives of a married couple have the right to seek an annulment if they feel the marriage lowers the extended family's status.


But this woman's situation pales when compared to the plight
of female foreign maids working in Saudi Arabia.  Underpaid, mistreated by their employers, they often have nowhere to turn to when things get tough and they try to protect themselves. 
Saudi authorities on Saturday beheaded an Indonesian maid convicted of killing her employer, the Interior Ministry announced.
The grounds of her conviction are suspect because of the inherent Saudi dislike of foreigners, especially women who aren't allowed to testify.
Hey Ms. Magazine, since you won't publish an ad depicting three successful Israeli women because some readers might object, maybe you could publish some pictures of these women.  Would anyone object?
In Saudi Arabia, a small step forward in women's rights doesn't even begin to overcome the restricted reality of women's life in this oil rich backward kingdom.   
In a major breakthrough--for them--
Women in Saudi Arabia can now stay in a hotel or a furnished apartment without a male guardian, according to a government decision that comes as the country faces increasing criticism for its severe restrictions on women.

The daily Al-Watan, which is deemed close to the Saudi government, reported Monday that the ministry issued a circular to hotels asking them to accept lone women - as long as their information is sent to a local police station.


However this slight advance won't help a Saudi woman sitting in jail
because her family doesn't like her husband. 
Under Saudi law, a woman needs the permission of her family to marry.

Saudi lawyer Abdul-Rahman al-Lahem, who used to represent the couple, said local interpretations of Islamic law hold that relatives of a married couple have the right to seek an annulment if they feel the marriage lowers the extended family's status.


But this woman's situation pales when compared to the plight
of female foreign maids working in Saudi Arabia.  Underpaid, mistreated by their employers, they often have nowhere to turn to when things get tough and they try to protect themselves. 
Saudi authorities on Saturday beheaded an Indonesian maid convicted of killing her employer, the Interior Ministry announced.
The grounds of her conviction are suspect because of the inherent Saudi dislike of foreigners, especially women who aren't allowed to testify.
Hey Ms. Magazine, since you won't publish an ad depicting three successful Israeli women because some readers might object, maybe you could publish some pictures of these women.  Would anyone object?