Push on for Michigan Dems to vote "Uncommitted" in Primary

Michigan's January 15th Democratic primary is meaningless at the moment thanks to sanctions put in place by the Democratic National Committee that denies any delegates to the state because they violated party rules and held their nominating contest prior to February 5.

(Note: The GOP sanctions on the state took only half the delegates from the state's total to be seated at the convention).

In fact, the DNC forbade any candidates from campaigning in the state or even being on the ballot (similar sanctions were leveled against Florida and three other states). But somehow, Hillary Clinton, Mike Gravel, and Dennis Kucinich are still on the ballot thanks to their refusal to remove their names once the paperwork had gone through.

Now there's a move on among Michigan Democrats to have people vote "uncomitted" on the primary ballot while the state tries to change the mind of the DNC about not seating any delegates:

U.S. Sen. Carl Levin and state Democratic Party Chair Mark Brewer said Michigan Dems can still have an indirect say in the nominating process if they check the "uncommitted" box on the ballot. State law prohibits write-ins for candidates who have not authorized write-in campaigns; Obama, Edwards and Richardson have not. If "uncommitted" draws at least 15 percent of the vote in a congressional district, delegates not bound to any candidate could be sent to the national convention, possibly enabling Obama and Edwards supporters to play a role in the nomination. "You can't afford not to vote in Michigan," Levin said. "It's critically important to vote to have impact on the delegates going to (the national party convention)." Michigan campaign teams for Obama and Edwards are actively urging their supporters to vote "uncommitted," Brewer said. Brewer is officially neutral in the presidential race, but he's long been a friend of labor, which generally has been supportive of Edwards in Michigan. Nationally, labor endorsements have been split.
Will both the GOP and Democrats risk alienating voters in Michigan and Florida - two of t he ten largest states in the Union - by continuing the sanctions? No one knows which is why this is probably a good move by Michigan Democrats.

But party rules forbid any kind of appeal - except on the convention floor. And that might be one interesting floor fight if Hillary wins the popular vote but many "uncommitted" delegates show up at the convention.
Michigan's January 15th Democratic primary is meaningless at the moment thanks to sanctions put in place by the Democratic National Committee that denies any delegates to the state because they violated party rules and held their nominating contest prior to February 5.

(Note: The GOP sanctions on the state took only half the delegates from the state's total to be seated at the convention).

In fact, the DNC forbade any candidates from campaigning in the state or even being on the ballot (similar sanctions were leveled against Florida and three other states). But somehow, Hillary Clinton, Mike Gravel, and Dennis Kucinich are still on the ballot thanks to their refusal to remove their names once the paperwork had gone through.

Now there's a move on among Michigan Democrats to have people vote "uncomitted" on the primary ballot while the state tries to change the mind of the DNC about not seating any delegates:

U.S. Sen. Carl Levin and state Democratic Party Chair Mark Brewer said Michigan Dems can still have an indirect say in the nominating process if they check the "uncommitted" box on the ballot. State law prohibits write-ins for candidates who have not authorized write-in campaigns; Obama, Edwards and Richardson have not. If "uncommitted" draws at least 15 percent of the vote in a congressional district, delegates not bound to any candidate could be sent to the national convention, possibly enabling Obama and Edwards supporters to play a role in the nomination. "You can't afford not to vote in Michigan," Levin said. "It's critically important to vote to have impact on the delegates going to (the national party convention)." Michigan campaign teams for Obama and Edwards are actively urging their supporters to vote "uncommitted," Brewer said. Brewer is officially neutral in the presidential race, but he's long been a friend of labor, which generally has been supportive of Edwards in Michigan. Nationally, labor endorsements have been split.
Will both the GOP and Democrats risk alienating voters in Michigan and Florida - two of t he ten largest states in the Union - by continuing the sanctions? No one knows which is why this is probably a good move by Michigan Democrats.

But party rules forbid any kind of appeal - except on the convention floor. And that might be one interesting floor fight if Hillary wins the popular vote but many "uncommitted" delegates show up at the convention.