Jurassic politics

Clarice Feldman and Rosslyn Smith
I thought Bill Clinton displayed a rare moment of truth on the campaign trail when he noted that his wife Hillary and John McCain are "very close".   I have been saying that for some time now when it comes to the all-important question of character.  Both Hillary Clinton and John McCain began their careers in elective politics out of a carpet bag after greatly enjoying their status as a Washington insider. (She as First Lady, he as the Navy's lobbyist to the U.S. Senate.)  

Both share a sense of entitlement that they are somehow smarter than all of us who live outside the Beltway. Both are notoriously thin skinned, have long memories and tend to demonize those who disagree with them. (A fresh example of this is how McCain continues to disparage Donald Rumsfeld on the stump long after the astringent former Secretary of Defense has left the political stage.)   And both Hillary Clinton and John McCain had their principal world views formed in the Vietnam era, albeit from opposing perspectives. 

A case can be made that neither candidate has really changed much except underwear and hairstyle since then. As a result, neither of them truly offers anything in the way of fresh ideas.  No wonder the reactionary editors of the NY Times like each of them so much.  If they are their parties' nominees the 2008 campaign may go down in the history books as the battle of two political fossils. 
I thought Bill Clinton displayed a rare moment of truth on the campaign trail when he noted that his wife Hillary and John McCain are "very close".   I have been saying that for some time now when it comes to the all-important question of character.  Both Hillary Clinton and John McCain began their careers in elective politics out of a carpet bag after greatly enjoying their status as a Washington insider. (She as First Lady, he as the Navy's lobbyist to the U.S. Senate.)  

Both share a sense of entitlement that they are somehow smarter than all of us who live outside the Beltway. Both are notoriously thin skinned, have long memories and tend to demonize those who disagree with them. (A fresh example of this is how McCain continues to disparage Donald Rumsfeld on the stump long after the astringent former Secretary of Defense has left the political stage.)   And both Hillary Clinton and John McCain had their principal world views formed in the Vietnam era, albeit from opposing perspectives. 

A case can be made that neither candidate has really changed much except underwear and hairstyle since then. As a result, neither of them truly offers anything in the way of fresh ideas.  No wonder the reactionary editors of the NY Times like each of them so much.  If they are their parties' nominees the 2008 campaign may go down in the history books as the battle of two political fossils.