Probing Clinton Library Funding Sources

Today, the Washington Post has an article about where a lot of the money for Bill Clinton's Presidential Library originated.

The Post confirmed numerous seven-figure donors to the library through interviews and tax records of foundations. Several foreign governments gave at least $1 million, including the Middle Eastern nations of Kuwait, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, as well as the governments of Taiwan and Brunei.

In addition, a handful of Middle Eastern business executives and officials also gave at least $1 million each, according to the interviews. They include Saudi businessmen Abdullah al-Dabbagh, Nasser al-Rashid and Walid Juffali, as well as Issam Fares, a U.S. citizen who previously served as deputy prime minister of Lebanon.

Spokesmen for Kuwait and Taiwan confirmed that each government has given the library $1 million. Both governments also donated to other presidential libraries. Kuwait contributed at least $1 million to the library of former president George H.W. Bush, and Taiwan gave $2 million to the Ronald Reagan library. Calls to the other governments were not returned, and the Middle Eastern individuals could not be located for comment.

Jack Kuei, a press officer for Taiwan in Washington, said his government's donation "is a way to promote a mutual understanding and it's a kind of public diplomacy." Kuwaiti counselor Jasem Albudaiwi called his nation's contribution "a friendly donation from the people and the government of Kuwait to the cause of the library."
And this doesn't include the $450,000 donation from the wife of former fugitive financier Marc Rich who, coincidentally, received a pardon from President Clinton in the waning hours of his Administration. In addition to questions about these donors, Ed Lasky informs us that the New York Times will run a story tomorrow on questionable donors to the library.

With Hillary's campaign already on the rocks and given her steadfast refusal to release any donor list, will this further erode her support.

It won't help.
Today, the Washington Post has an article about where a lot of the money for Bill Clinton's Presidential Library originated.

The Post confirmed numerous seven-figure donors to the library through interviews and tax records of foundations. Several foreign governments gave at least $1 million, including the Middle Eastern nations of Kuwait, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, as well as the governments of Taiwan and Brunei.

In addition, a handful of Middle Eastern business executives and officials also gave at least $1 million each, according to the interviews. They include Saudi businessmen Abdullah al-Dabbagh, Nasser al-Rashid and Walid Juffali, as well as Issam Fares, a U.S. citizen who previously served as deputy prime minister of Lebanon.

Spokesmen for Kuwait and Taiwan confirmed that each government has given the library $1 million. Both governments also donated to other presidential libraries. Kuwait contributed at least $1 million to the library of former president George H.W. Bush, and Taiwan gave $2 million to the Ronald Reagan library. Calls to the other governments were not returned, and the Middle Eastern individuals could not be located for comment.

Jack Kuei, a press officer for Taiwan in Washington, said his government's donation "is a way to promote a mutual understanding and it's a kind of public diplomacy." Kuwaiti counselor Jasem Albudaiwi called his nation's contribution "a friendly donation from the people and the government of Kuwait to the cause of the library."
And this doesn't include the $450,000 donation from the wife of former fugitive financier Marc Rich who, coincidentally, received a pardon from President Clinton in the waning hours of his Administration. In addition to questions about these donors, Ed Lasky informs us that the New York Times will run a story tomorrow on questionable donors to the library.

With Hillary's campaign already on the rocks and given her steadfast refusal to release any donor list, will this further erode her support.

It won't help.