Huckabee calls foul on Romney: Then insults Mormons

Ed Lasky
Presidential candidate Mike Huckabee referred to Mitt Romney as a "tattle-tale in third grade" for the attacks on him in ads put out by the former Massachussets governor.

But Huckabee then showed that he himself is not above a little gutter politics.

 
The damaging passage in the piece by Zev Chafets:

'Huckabee ... has no trouble making his feelings known. He mentioned how much he respected his fellow candidates John McCain and Rudolph W. Giuliani. The name of his principal rival in Iowa, Mitt Romney, went unmentioned. Romney, a Mormon, had promised that he would be addressing the subject of his religion a few days later. I asked Huckabee, who describes himself as the only Republican candidate with a degree in theology, if he considered Mormonism a cult or a religion. 'I think it's a religion,' he said. 'I really don't know much about it.' I was about to jot down this piece of boilerplate when Huckabee surprised me with a question of his own: 'Don't Mormons,' he asked in an innocent voice, 'believe that Jesus and the devil are brothers?'


"Innocent?" If a presidential candidate isn't weighing every word that comes out of his mouth - especially on such an explosive subject - he has no business in the race. Huckabee knew full well what he was saying and who he was saying it to. He was reminding Christian conservatives of who the "real" Christian in the race was.

Huckabee "explains" in a news release:

'A report released tonight cites an upcoming article in the Sunday edition of The New York Times Magazine which quotes former Arkansas governor and presidential candidate Mike Huckabee asking a question about the content of the Mormon faith. In fact, the full context of the exchange makes it clear that Governor Huckabee was illustrating his unwillingness to answer questions about Mormonism and to avoid addressing theological questions during this campaign.
'Governor Huckabee has said consistently that he believes this campaign should center on a discussion of the important issues confronting our nation,' said Senior Advisor, Dr. Charmaine Yoest, 'and not focus on questions of religious belief. He wants to assure persons of all faith traditions of his firm commitment to religious tolerance and freedom of worship. Governor Huckabee believes that one of the great strengths of our nation lies in its diversity of thought, opinion and faith.' '
How very thoughtful of him. Except, of course, the damage is already done, the slur is already out there.
Presidential candidate Mike Huckabee referred to Mitt Romney as a "tattle-tale in third grade" for the attacks on him in ads put out by the former Massachussets governor.

But Huckabee then showed that he himself is not above a little gutter politics.

 
The damaging passage in the piece by Zev Chafets:

'Huckabee ... has no trouble making his feelings known. He mentioned how much he respected his fellow candidates John McCain and Rudolph W. Giuliani. The name of his principal rival in Iowa, Mitt Romney, went unmentioned. Romney, a Mormon, had promised that he would be addressing the subject of his religion a few days later. I asked Huckabee, who describes himself as the only Republican candidate with a degree in theology, if he considered Mormonism a cult or a religion. 'I think it's a religion,' he said. 'I really don't know much about it.' I was about to jot down this piece of boilerplate when Huckabee surprised me with a question of his own: 'Don't Mormons,' he asked in an innocent voice, 'believe that Jesus and the devil are brothers?'


"Innocent?" If a presidential candidate isn't weighing every word that comes out of his mouth - especially on such an explosive subject - he has no business in the race. Huckabee knew full well what he was saying and who he was saying it to. He was reminding Christian conservatives of who the "real" Christian in the race was.

Huckabee "explains" in a news release:

'A report released tonight cites an upcoming article in the Sunday edition of The New York Times Magazine which quotes former Arkansas governor and presidential candidate Mike Huckabee asking a question about the content of the Mormon faith. In fact, the full context of the exchange makes it clear that Governor Huckabee was illustrating his unwillingness to answer questions about Mormonism and to avoid addressing theological questions during this campaign.
'Governor Huckabee has said consistently that he believes this campaign should center on a discussion of the important issues confronting our nation,' said Senior Advisor, Dr. Charmaine Yoest, 'and not focus on questions of religious belief. He wants to assure persons of all faith traditions of his firm commitment to religious tolerance and freedom of worship. Governor Huckabee believes that one of the great strengths of our nation lies in its diversity of thought, opinion and faith.' '
How very thoughtful of him. Except, of course, the damage is already done, the slur is already out there.