Dramatic Decline in Car Bombs in Iraq

Stars and Stripes is reporting a big drop in car bomb attacks in Baghdad this month:

"VBIEDs are not a major threat against coalition forces in Baghdad right now," RisCassi said in a recent interview.

Indeed, according to figures released by the military in October, car bomb attacks throughout the country have gone down 65 percent since the "surge" in June.
Michael Goldfarb of the Weekly Standard has more good news:
You don't want to jinx it, but the first half of December has seen remarkably light casualties among U.S. forces. As of today, icasualties.org only counts seven U.S. servicemen killed in Iraq for December, and of those, only five were killed by hostile fire. If the trend holds, obviously a big if, it could be the lowest casualty total for U.S. troops of any month since the war started.

Unfortunately, civilian casualties are on pace for a total of a little under 500--right around where they were last month, but down more than 80 percent from their peak in February. And of course, vehicle borne explosives are al Qaeda's preferred method for generating mass casualty attacks
The news from the front has changed the political dynamic here at home. Bush's poll numbers are up (37% approval) and the Iraq War as an issue dragging the GOP down has moderated somewhat although people are disinclined to give Republicans any credit for the turnaround in Iraq.

Let's hope our boys have a safe and quiet Christmas season.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky
Stars and Stripes is reporting a big drop in car bomb attacks in Baghdad this month:

"VBIEDs are not a major threat against coalition forces in Baghdad right now," RisCassi said in a recent interview.

Indeed, according to figures released by the military in October, car bomb attacks throughout the country have gone down 65 percent since the "surge" in June.
Michael Goldfarb of the Weekly Standard has more good news:
You don't want to jinx it, but the first half of December has seen remarkably light casualties among U.S. forces. As of today, icasualties.org only counts seven U.S. servicemen killed in Iraq for December, and of those, only five were killed by hostile fire. If the trend holds, obviously a big if, it could be the lowest casualty total for U.S. troops of any month since the war started.

Unfortunately, civilian casualties are on pace for a total of a little under 500--right around where they were last month, but down more than 80 percent from their peak in February. And of course, vehicle borne explosives are al Qaeda's preferred method for generating mass casualty attacks
The news from the front has changed the political dynamic here at home. Bush's poll numbers are up (37% approval) and the Iraq War as an issue dragging the GOP down has moderated somewhat although people are disinclined to give Republicans any credit for the turnaround in Iraq.

Let's hope our boys have a safe and quiet Christmas season.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky