Des Moines Register endorses McCain, Hillary

The Des Moines Register has released its party endorsements for the Iowa Caucuses and the winners of that coveted nod are Hillary Clinton and John McCain. Also on the endorsement front, the Boston Globe, a newspaper widely read in next door New Hampshire, has aslo endorsed McCain as well as Barack Obama on the Democratic side:



The Register endorsement is one that counts much more on the Dem side, because that is the way they lean editorially. Further, McCain is not putting up much of a fight in Iowa, instead pinning all his hopes on a New Hampshire victory to breathe new life into his campaign.

Just the same, the Globe doesn't do much of anything for New Hampshire Republicans. But their backing is likely more significant than that of the Register. Why? Because, with the coveted endorsement of the Union Leader in one hand to show off to conservatives and the Globe in the other,

McCain can make the case in the Granite State that he is uniquely qualified to draw the support of both Republicans and moderate-leaning Independents. Who else, after all, could bring together the likes of Joseph McQuaid and the New York Times company-owned Boston broadsheet?
Here's what the Register said about McCain:
"Time after time, McCain has stuck to his beliefs in the face of opposition from other elected leaders and the public. He has criticized crop and ethanol subsidies during two presidential campaigns in Iowa. He bucked his party and president by opposing the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts.

A year ago, in the face of growing criticism, he staunchly supported President Bush’s decision to increase troop strength in Iraq. "In this campaign, he continues to support comprehensive immigration reform — while watching his poll standings plunge. Some other Republican candidates refuse to acknowledge that climate change is a serious threat caused by human activity. McCain has worked on the issue for seven years and sponsored bills to limit greenhouse-gas emissions.
McCain has always been something of a media darling - a "maverick" as the press likes to refer to him - and his endorsement in Iowa will not do him much good since he has given up competing their in favor of trying to resurrect his campaign in New Hampshire. And in that task, he seems to be making headway. Coupled with the fact that both Democrats and Independents can cross over and vote in the GOP primary, a strong turnout would probably help McCain immensely. As for Hillary's coup in snagging the Reigster endorsement, the paper had this to say:
In the Senate, she has earned a reputation as a workhorse who does not seek the limelight. She honed knowledge of defense on the Senate Armed Services Committee. She has proactively served rural and urban New York and worked in the national interest, strengthening the Children’s Health Insurance Program. Clinton is tough.

Tested by rough politics and personal trials, she’s demonstrated strength, resolve and resilience. Can she inspire the nation? Clinton is still criticized in some quarters as being too guarded and calculating. (As president, when she makes a mistake, she should just say so.)

Indeed, Obama, her chief rival, inspired our imaginations. But it was Clinton who inspired our confidence. Each time we met, she impressed us with her knowledge and her competence.
At the very least, the Register endorsement probably stopped the bleeding in Iowa. Whether it's enough to reignite her campaign there remains to be seen. As for Obama's Globe endorsement, it is significant but a lot less impactful than the Register nod:
Many have remarked on Obama's extraordinary biography: that he is the biracial son of a father from Kenya and a mother who had him at 18; that he was raised in the dynamic, multi-ethnic cultures of Hawaii and Indonesia; that he went from being president of the Harvard Law Review to the gritty and often thankless work of community organizing in Chicago; that, at 46, he would be the first post-baby-boom president.

What is more extraordinary is how Obama seals each of these experiences to his politics. One of the lessons he took from organizing poor families in Chicago, he says, was "how much people felt locked out of their government," even at the local level. That experience anchors his commitment to transparency and accountability in Washington.
It is something of a stretch for the Globe to refer to Obama's overseas and "multi-ethnic" experience and try to turn that into a foreign policy qualification. But the empty resume of the Illinois Senator meant that the newspaper had to stretch his meager experience as far as it would go to make their endorsement of the most liberal candidate in the race seem plausible. All in all, a shot in the arm to McCain, a boost for Hillary, and a nice plug for Obama.

Of the three, McCain would seem to benefit most. It should be interesting to watch his poll numbers in the next few weeks in New Hampshire to see what affect, if any, these endorsements may have.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky
 
The Des Moines Register has released its party endorsements for the Iowa Caucuses and the winners of that coveted nod are Hillary Clinton and John McCain. Also on the endorsement front, the Boston Globe, a newspaper widely read in next door New Hampshire, has aslo endorsed McCain as well as Barack Obama on the Democratic side:



The Register endorsement is one that counts much more on the Dem side, because that is the way they lean editorially. Further, McCain is not putting up much of a fight in Iowa, instead pinning all his hopes on a New Hampshire victory to breathe new life into his campaign.

Just the same, the Globe doesn't do much of anything for New Hampshire Republicans. But their backing is likely more significant than that of the Register. Why? Because, with the coveted endorsement of the Union Leader in one hand to show off to conservatives and the Globe in the other,

McCain can make the case in the Granite State that he is uniquely qualified to draw the support of both Republicans and moderate-leaning Independents. Who else, after all, could bring together the likes of Joseph McQuaid and the New York Times company-owned Boston broadsheet?
Here's what the Register said about McCain:
"Time after time, McCain has stuck to his beliefs in the face of opposition from other elected leaders and the public. He has criticized crop and ethanol subsidies during two presidential campaigns in Iowa. He bucked his party and president by opposing the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts.

A year ago, in the face of growing criticism, he staunchly supported President Bush’s decision to increase troop strength in Iraq. "In this campaign, he continues to support comprehensive immigration reform — while watching his poll standings plunge. Some other Republican candidates refuse to acknowledge that climate change is a serious threat caused by human activity. McCain has worked on the issue for seven years and sponsored bills to limit greenhouse-gas emissions.
McCain has always been something of a media darling - a "maverick" as the press likes to refer to him - and his endorsement in Iowa will not do him much good since he has given up competing their in favor of trying to resurrect his campaign in New Hampshire. And in that task, he seems to be making headway. Coupled with the fact that both Democrats and Independents can cross over and vote in the GOP primary, a strong turnout would probably help McCain immensely. As for Hillary's coup in snagging the Reigster endorsement, the paper had this to say:
In the Senate, she has earned a reputation as a workhorse who does not seek the limelight. She honed knowledge of defense on the Senate Armed Services Committee. She has proactively served rural and urban New York and worked in the national interest, strengthening the Children’s Health Insurance Program. Clinton is tough.

Tested by rough politics and personal trials, she’s demonstrated strength, resolve and resilience. Can she inspire the nation? Clinton is still criticized in some quarters as being too guarded and calculating. (As president, when she makes a mistake, she should just say so.)

Indeed, Obama, her chief rival, inspired our imaginations. But it was Clinton who inspired our confidence. Each time we met, she impressed us with her knowledge and her competence.
At the very least, the Register endorsement probably stopped the bleeding in Iowa. Whether it's enough to reignite her campaign there remains to be seen. As for Obama's Globe endorsement, it is significant but a lot less impactful than the Register nod:
Many have remarked on Obama's extraordinary biography: that he is the biracial son of a father from Kenya and a mother who had him at 18; that he was raised in the dynamic, multi-ethnic cultures of Hawaii and Indonesia; that he went from being president of the Harvard Law Review to the gritty and often thankless work of community organizing in Chicago; that, at 46, he would be the first post-baby-boom president.

What is more extraordinary is how Obama seals each of these experiences to his politics. One of the lessons he took from organizing poor families in Chicago, he says, was "how much people felt locked out of their government," even at the local level. That experience anchors his commitment to transparency and accountability in Washington.
It is something of a stretch for the Globe to refer to Obama's overseas and "multi-ethnic" experience and try to turn that into a foreign policy qualification. But the empty resume of the Illinois Senator meant that the newspaper had to stretch his meager experience as far as it would go to make their endorsement of the most liberal candidate in the race seem plausible. All in all, a shot in the arm to McCain, a boost for Hillary, and a nice plug for Obama.

Of the three, McCain would seem to benefit most. It should be interesting to watch his poll numbers in the next few weeks in New Hampshire to see what affect, if any, these endorsements may have.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky