BBC covered up London terror trainer

In News of the Terminally Weird, the Times of London reports that the tax-funded BBC paid one Mohammed Hamid and two other radical Islamists, 

"... to go on a paintballing trip at the Delta Force centre in Tonbridge, Kent, in February 2005. ... The men, accused of terrorism training, were filmed for a BBC programme called Don't Panic, I'm Islamic, screened in June 2005. "
Delta Force Paintballing is simulated combat training, using paintballs rather than live ammo. 

But wait, there's more.

"Nasreen Suleaman, a researcher on the programme, told the court that Mr Hamid, 50, contacted her after the July 2005 attack and told her of his association with the bombers. But she said that she felt no obligation to contact the police with this information. Ms Suleaman said that she informed senior BBC managers but was not told to contact the police."   (Italics added.)
Said the prosecutor,

"Here was a man who told you that he knew those individuals who ... were still at large for ... the attempted bombings of the transport network ... and he was telling you he had some knowledge of them? There was a worldwide manhunt going on, wasn't there?"
She replied: "I got the sense that he was already talking to the police. I referred it to my immediate boss at the BBC. I wasn't told that there was an obligation. In fact it was referred above her as well. It was  such a big story."
She added: "I don't think it's my obligation to tell another adult that he should go to the police."  (Italics added.)
But wait, there's even more.

"Phil Rees, who produced the (BBC) show (Don't Panic, I'm Islamic), told the court that he was impressed by Mr Hamid's sense of  humour while looking for someone to appear in the documentary.

He said: "I think he had a comic touch and he represented a strand within British Muslims. I took it as more like a rather Steptoe and Son figure rather than seriously persuasive. I saw him as a kind of Cockney comic."

Mr Rees, who now works for the Arabic TV station al-Jazeera, gave Mr Hamid a signed copy of his book Dining With Terrorists. "  (Italics added.)
This story is either insanely funny, or just plain insane. It makes me yearn for the days of hanging judges. At least they took mass murder seriously.

James Lewis blogs at dangeroustimes.wordpress.com
In News of the Terminally Weird, the Times of London reports that the tax-funded BBC paid one Mohammed Hamid and two other radical Islamists, 

"... to go on a paintballing trip at the Delta Force centre in Tonbridge, Kent, in February 2005. ... The men, accused of terrorism training, were filmed for a BBC programme called Don't Panic, I'm Islamic, screened in June 2005. "
Delta Force Paintballing is simulated combat training, using paintballs rather than live ammo. 

But wait, there's more.

"Nasreen Suleaman, a researcher on the programme, told the court that Mr Hamid, 50, contacted her after the July 2005 attack and told her of his association with the bombers. But she said that she felt no obligation to contact the police with this information. Ms Suleaman said that she informed senior BBC managers but was not told to contact the police."   (Italics added.)
Said the prosecutor,

"Here was a man who told you that he knew those individuals who ... were still at large for ... the attempted bombings of the transport network ... and he was telling you he had some knowledge of them? There was a worldwide manhunt going on, wasn't there?"
She replied: "I got the sense that he was already talking to the police. I referred it to my immediate boss at the BBC. I wasn't told that there was an obligation. In fact it was referred above her as well. It was  such a big story."
She added: "I don't think it's my obligation to tell another adult that he should go to the police."  (Italics added.)
But wait, there's even more.

"Phil Rees, who produced the (BBC) show (Don't Panic, I'm Islamic), told the court that he was impressed by Mr Hamid's sense of  humour while looking for someone to appear in the documentary.

He said: "I think he had a comic touch and he represented a strand within British Muslims. I took it as more like a rather Steptoe and Son figure rather than seriously persuasive. I saw him as a kind of Cockney comic."

Mr Rees, who now works for the Arabic TV station al-Jazeera, gave Mr Hamid a signed copy of his book Dining With Terrorists. "  (Italics added.)
This story is either insanely funny, or just plain insane. It makes me yearn for the days of hanging judges. At least they took mass murder seriously.

James Lewis blogs at dangeroustimes.wordpress.com