Another Successful 'Money Bomb' for Ron Paul

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Calling it "The Boston Tea Party," Ron Paul supporters staged another on line one day "money bomb that raised even more than the November fund raiser:

Republican presidential hopeful Ron Paul's supporters raised more than $6 million Sunday to boost the 10-term Texas congressman's campaign for the White House.

The goal was to raise as much money as possible on the Internet in one day. The campaign's previous fundraiser, in November, brought in $4.2 million.

At 9 p.m PST, donations were more than $6 million, the campaign's website said. The donations are credit card receipts, said spokesman

Jesse Benton. Benton said the median donation for the fundraiser, which was the idea of Paul supporters not officially connected to the campaign, was about $50.
The effort was called "The Boston Tea Party" because yesterday was the 234th anniversary of that event.

The cash will probably vault Paul close to the top of GOP candidates in fundraising for the quarter. The question is, what good is it doing him?

Paul may enjoy the most enthusiastic supporters among all the candidates but this has not translated into the kind of broad based support nationally - or in any one state- that gives him a ghost of a chance of winning.

Paul is at 7% in Iowa, 8% in New Hampshire, less than 5% in Florida, and 7% in Michigan according to the latest polls in those states. The only contest he is registering double digits is in South Carolina where he garners 11% of the vote, trailing front runner Mike Huckabee who is at 24%.

With no chance at the GOP nomination, it is believed by some that despite his denials, Paul will eventually be unable to resist the calls for him to run as a third party candidate. If that were to happen, the race in November would become very complicated indeed.
Calling it "The Boston Tea Party," Ron Paul supporters staged another on line one day "money bomb that raised even more than the November fund raiser:

Republican presidential hopeful Ron Paul's supporters raised more than $6 million Sunday to boost the 10-term Texas congressman's campaign for the White House.

The goal was to raise as much money as possible on the Internet in one day. The campaign's previous fundraiser, in November, brought in $4.2 million.

At 9 p.m PST, donations were more than $6 million, the campaign's website said. The donations are credit card receipts, said spokesman

Jesse Benton. Benton said the median donation for the fundraiser, which was the idea of Paul supporters not officially connected to the campaign, was about $50.
The effort was called "The Boston Tea Party" because yesterday was the 234th anniversary of that event.

The cash will probably vault Paul close to the top of GOP candidates in fundraising for the quarter. The question is, what good is it doing him?

Paul may enjoy the most enthusiastic supporters among all the candidates but this has not translated into the kind of broad based support nationally - or in any one state- that gives him a ghost of a chance of winning.

Paul is at 7% in Iowa, 8% in New Hampshire, less than 5% in Florida, and 7% in Michigan according to the latest polls in those states. The only contest he is registering double digits is in South Carolina where he garners 11% of the vote, trailing front runner Mike Huckabee who is at 24%.

With no chance at the GOP nomination, it is believed by some that despite his denials, Paul will eventually be unable to resist the calls for him to run as a third party candidate. If that were to happen, the race in November would become very complicated indeed.