US Deaths in Iraq Lowest Since March, 2006

Rick Moran
Slowly but perceptibly, the Iraq narrative in the media is beginning to change.

It is still a very dangerous place, but there is no doubt that violence in the country is beginning to subside as Sunni insurgents lay down their arms and join the US in fighting al-Qaeda. This has meant fewer US comabt casualties:

The number of U.S. combat deaths in Iraq is headed for the lowest level in more than a year and a half and the fifth consecutive monthly decline.

Twenty-seven Americans have been killed in action in October, with one day left in the month, Pentagon records show. That would be the lowest monthly level since March 2006, when 27 servicemembers died in hostile action, according to a USA TODAY analysis of Pentagon reports.

The total number of U.S. deaths, including accidents, in October so far is 35, records show. A new strategy, backed up by 30,000 more U.S. servicemembers, has led to a decline in violence and weakened al-Qaeda, commanders say.

The U.S. military started building combat outposts and moving troops outside major bases earlier this year in an attempt to provide more security.
The media narrative is having a hard time keeping up with the facts, For example, in Baghdad, their were nearly 2500 attacks in January. In October, there were less than 600. That's still almost 20 attacks a day but a vast improvement nonetheless.

Except the
Associated Press can't figure out the meaning of it all:

...the meaning of these statistics is disputed, and experts generally agree that the struggle for security and stability is far from over. . . . The relative period of calm—if that’s what it is—came during the Muslim fast of Ramadan.
Rob at Say Anything:
The funny thing is that when violence in Iraq is escalating, the journalists always know what it is and the meaning is never disputed. When violence is escalating, they call it “civil war” and imply that it means the war in Iraq is a failure.
I might also point out that during past Ramadan periods, the violence escalated substantially.

As the news continues to improve from Iraq, I have little doubt that reports from the War will be shunted to the inside of the paper. The press is tip toeing away from the story already and will continue to do so - unless things go south, of course.

Now that's news.
Slowly but perceptibly, the Iraq narrative in the media is beginning to change.

It is still a very dangerous place, but there is no doubt that violence in the country is beginning to subside as Sunni insurgents lay down their arms and join the US in fighting al-Qaeda. This has meant fewer US comabt casualties:

The number of U.S. combat deaths in Iraq is headed for the lowest level in more than a year and a half and the fifth consecutive monthly decline.

Twenty-seven Americans have been killed in action in October, with one day left in the month, Pentagon records show. That would be the lowest monthly level since March 2006, when 27 servicemembers died in hostile action, according to a USA TODAY analysis of Pentagon reports.

The total number of U.S. deaths, including accidents, in October so far is 35, records show. A new strategy, backed up by 30,000 more U.S. servicemembers, has led to a decline in violence and weakened al-Qaeda, commanders say.

The U.S. military started building combat outposts and moving troops outside major bases earlier this year in an attempt to provide more security.
The media narrative is having a hard time keeping up with the facts, For example, in Baghdad, their were nearly 2500 attacks in January. In October, there were less than 600. That's still almost 20 attacks a day but a vast improvement nonetheless.

Except the
Associated Press can't figure out the meaning of it all:

...the meaning of these statistics is disputed, and experts generally agree that the struggle for security and stability is far from over. . . . The relative period of calm—if that’s what it is—came during the Muslim fast of Ramadan.
Rob at Say Anything:
The funny thing is that when violence in Iraq is escalating, the journalists always know what it is and the meaning is never disputed. When violence is escalating, they call it “civil war” and imply that it means the war in Iraq is a failure.
I might also point out that during past Ramadan periods, the violence escalated substantially.

As the news continues to improve from Iraq, I have little doubt that reports from the War will be shunted to the inside of the paper. The press is tip toeing away from the story already and will continue to do so - unless things go south, of course.

Now that's news.