Justice for AMIA Victims?

Rick Moran
Terror came to Argentina on July 18, 1994 in the form of a massive car bomb that blew up the Jewish Community Center in that city (AIMA), leaving 85 dead and nearly 300 injured.

It is generally agreed that Argentinian authorities botched the original investigation as well as a follow up inquiry, with corruption and irregularities preventing authorities from getting to the bottom of who was really behind the attack.

But last year, two Argentinian prosecutors formally charged Iran with being behind the attacks. They further accused the terrorist group Hezb'allah of executing the crime.

Now the international law enforcement group INTERPOL has called for the arrest of 5 specific perpetrators of the attack:


Earlier this week Interpol voted overwhelmingly (74-14 with 26 abstentions) to issue a red letter calling for the arrest of five Iranians accused by the Argentine government of orchestrating the 1994 bombing of the Jewish communal offices (known as AMIA) in Buenos Aires.

This move may not bring real justice to the AMIA victims, but it is a small step in the right direction and it sheds important light on the nature of the Iranian regime. Interpol’s red letter placed five Iranians and Hezbollah’s notorious director of external operations on its most wanted list.

This move will probably not bring the perpetrators of the bombing to justice. Interpol has no power force these arrests. Countries that abide by international standards are likely to comply; countries that evade international standards do not comply.

Iran is notorious for evading international standards, on issues large (such as the nuclear program) and small (such as keeping politics out of the Olympics). Unsurprisingly Iran lobbied heavily against the decision and accuses Interpol of bowing to U.S. pressure.
Argentina has also initiated a program of compensation for the victim's families.

It appears that after more than a decade of corruption, cover-up, and denial, the international community is finally lining up to hold the Iranians responsible for one of the deadliest terrorist attacks in the 1990's. Although no one expects any arrests any time soon. shining a light on Hezb'allah and especially Iran, illuminating their international thuggery is a good first step.
Terror came to Argentina on July 18, 1994 in the form of a massive car bomb that blew up the Jewish Community Center in that city (AIMA), leaving 85 dead and nearly 300 injured.

It is generally agreed that Argentinian authorities botched the original investigation as well as a follow up inquiry, with corruption and irregularities preventing authorities from getting to the bottom of who was really behind the attack.

But last year, two Argentinian prosecutors formally charged Iran with being behind the attacks. They further accused the terrorist group Hezb'allah of executing the crime.

Now the international law enforcement group INTERPOL has called for the arrest of 5 specific perpetrators of the attack:


Earlier this week Interpol voted overwhelmingly (74-14 with 26 abstentions) to issue a red letter calling for the arrest of five Iranians accused by the Argentine government of orchestrating the 1994 bombing of the Jewish communal offices (known as AMIA) in Buenos Aires.

This move may not bring real justice to the AMIA victims, but it is a small step in the right direction and it sheds important light on the nature of the Iranian regime. Interpol’s red letter placed five Iranians and Hezbollah’s notorious director of external operations on its most wanted list.

This move will probably not bring the perpetrators of the bombing to justice. Interpol has no power force these arrests. Countries that abide by international standards are likely to comply; countries that evade international standards do not comply.

Iran is notorious for evading international standards, on issues large (such as the nuclear program) and small (such as keeping politics out of the Olympics). Unsurprisingly Iran lobbied heavily against the decision and accuses Interpol of bowing to U.S. pressure.
Argentina has also initiated a program of compensation for the victim's families.

It appears that after more than a decade of corruption, cover-up, and denial, the international community is finally lining up to hold the Iranians responsible for one of the deadliest terrorist attacks in the 1990's. Although no one expects any arrests any time soon. shining a light on Hezb'allah and especially Iran, illuminating their international thuggery is a good first step.