Indian Communists reverse stance on nuke talks

Some good news on the stalled Indo-US nuclear treaty  is being reported by Bloomberg.  Indian Communists have backed down and will allow the ruling government to start safeguard negotiations with the International Atomic Energy Agency, on the condition that the government won't enter into a final agreement without the Communist-Hindu coalition's approval. 

The very inmportant deal had nearly been sunk by staunch opposition from the Indian Communists with the assistance of the American 
Left. The Pact is critical to satisfy India's rising energy needs in order to isolate Iran and stymie Putin's bid for influence in South Asia.

However, many hurdles remain before the entire treaty can be implemented.  These intial rounds of talks are designed only to gain approval from the IAEA for the safeguards plan and the protocol for international inspections of India's nuclear facilities.  Addiionally, the agreement requires approval by the 45-nation Nuclear Suppliers Group, and it would then need to be ratified by the U.S. Congress.

There are several reasons for the Communists' change of heart,  but P. R. Chari, a strategic analyst at the Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies in New Delhi thinks it's due to popular pressure in their own backyard.  West Bengal is governed by leftist parties, and violence in the Nandigram area of West Bengal "has led to accusations of human rights violations by civil liberties groups against the communist government and party members" who run the state.

Regardless of the internal politics, it's one small step forward with many more challenges yet to be overcome.  Sadly, the most difficult step would be gaining approval from our own Democrat-led Congress, which has obstructed  our global strategy in the War on Terror at virtually every turn.  Stay tuned.
Some good news on the stalled Indo-US nuclear treaty  is being reported by Bloomberg.  Indian Communists have backed down and will allow the ruling government to start safeguard negotiations with the International Atomic Energy Agency, on the condition that the government won't enter into a final agreement without the Communist-Hindu coalition's approval. 

The very inmportant deal had nearly been sunk by staunch opposition from the Indian Communists with the assistance of the American 
Left. The Pact is critical to satisfy India's rising energy needs in order to isolate Iran and stymie Putin's bid for influence in South Asia.

However, many hurdles remain before the entire treaty can be implemented.  These intial rounds of talks are designed only to gain approval from the IAEA for the safeguards plan and the protocol for international inspections of India's nuclear facilities.  Addiionally, the agreement requires approval by the 45-nation Nuclear Suppliers Group, and it would then need to be ratified by the U.S. Congress.

There are several reasons for the Communists' change of heart,  but P. R. Chari, a strategic analyst at the Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies in New Delhi thinks it's due to popular pressure in their own backyard.  West Bengal is governed by leftist parties, and violence in the Nandigram area of West Bengal "has led to accusations of human rights violations by civil liberties groups against the communist government and party members" who run the state.

Regardless of the internal politics, it's one small step forward with many more challenges yet to be overcome.  Sadly, the most difficult step would be gaining approval from our own Democrat-led Congress, which has obstructed  our global strategy in the War on Terror at virtually every turn.  Stay tuned.