Hillary's Lead Cut in Half in New Hampshire

Rick Moran
The latest Marist Poll is out and Hillary Clinton's once formidable 20 point lead has been cut in half by Senator Barack Obama.

Hillary Clinton’s once commanding lead over her Democratic rivals for the 2008 New Hampshire Democratic Presidential Primary has been nearly halved. Last month, Clinton led her closest competitor, Barack Obama, by 21 percentage points. Now, the gap has narrowed to just 11 percentage points. 36% of likely Democratic presidential primary voters support Senator Clinton followed by 25% for Senator Obama. Former Senator John Edwards receives 14%. The remaining candidates, Governor Bill Richardson, Congressman Dennis Kucinich, Senator Joe Biden, Senator Chris Dodd, and former Senator Mike Gravel trail with single digit support.
On the GOP side, Mitt Romney still holds a commanding lead over Rudy Giuliani:
Former Governor Mitt Romney leads the field of candidates seeking the Republican presidential nomination. 33% of likely New Hampshire Republican Presidential Primary voters support Romney compared with 22% for former Mayor Rudy Giuliani, and 13% for Senator John McCain. The remaining candidates, Congressman Ron Paul, former Governor Mike Huckabee, former Senator Fred Thompson, Congressman Tom Tancredo, and Congressman Duncan Hunter have only single digit support.
It may be that the well-oiled Clinton campaign has started to go off the tracks lately with the candidate's poor debate performance as a catalyst for Democrats to question Hillary's electability. That and the attacks by both John Edwards and Obama on Clinton's position regarding Iran may have dented her armor a bit.

For the Republicans, former Massachusetts Governor Romney is drawing wide support in next door New Hampshire. The surprise is Fred Thompson's poor performance. Both Mike Huckabee and Ron Paul are outpolling the former Tennessee senator at this point, just about 2 months from primary day.

Thompson hasn't visited the state much which does not sit well with New Hampshire voters who prefer to vote for candidates they have met personally whereas Romney has been to the state dozens of times and has already made some big media buys.
The latest Marist Poll is out and Hillary Clinton's once formidable 20 point lead has been cut in half by Senator Barack Obama.

Hillary Clinton’s once commanding lead over her Democratic rivals for the 2008 New Hampshire Democratic Presidential Primary has been nearly halved. Last month, Clinton led her closest competitor, Barack Obama, by 21 percentage points. Now, the gap has narrowed to just 11 percentage points. 36% of likely Democratic presidential primary voters support Senator Clinton followed by 25% for Senator Obama. Former Senator John Edwards receives 14%. The remaining candidates, Governor Bill Richardson, Congressman Dennis Kucinich, Senator Joe Biden, Senator Chris Dodd, and former Senator Mike Gravel trail with single digit support.
On the GOP side, Mitt Romney still holds a commanding lead over Rudy Giuliani:
Former Governor Mitt Romney leads the field of candidates seeking the Republican presidential nomination. 33% of likely New Hampshire Republican Presidential Primary voters support Romney compared with 22% for former Mayor Rudy Giuliani, and 13% for Senator John McCain. The remaining candidates, Congressman Ron Paul, former Governor Mike Huckabee, former Senator Fred Thompson, Congressman Tom Tancredo, and Congressman Duncan Hunter have only single digit support.
It may be that the well-oiled Clinton campaign has started to go off the tracks lately with the candidate's poor debate performance as a catalyst for Democrats to question Hillary's electability. That and the attacks by both John Edwards and Obama on Clinton's position regarding Iran may have dented her armor a bit.

For the Republicans, former Massachusetts Governor Romney is drawing wide support in next door New Hampshire. The surprise is Fred Thompson's poor performance. Both Mike Huckabee and Ron Paul are outpolling the former Tennessee senator at this point, just about 2 months from primary day.

Thompson hasn't visited the state much which does not sit well with New Hampshire voters who prefer to vote for candidates they have met personally whereas Romney has been to the state dozens of times and has already made some big media buys.