Britain to Give Gore Film a 'BS' Rating

A British truck driver who sought to stop the documentary An Inconvenient Truth from "brainwashing" his children appears to have won a partial victory.  Although the film will, indeed, be shown in 3,500 schools, teachers will be required to warn students that they're only hearing one side's questionable opinions on global warming.

Stewart Dimmock took the issue to court when he learned that the film he considered "unfit for schools because it is politically biased and contains serious scientific inaccuracies and 'sentimental mush'" was to be force fed to England's secondary school pupils.  The Dover father of two stated at the hearing:
"I wish my children to have the best education possible, free from bias and political spin, and Mr Gore's film falls far short of the standard required."
Having heard testimony that the flick contains "a number of inaccuracies, exaggerations and statements about global warming for which there is currently insufficient scientific evidence", the court is reportedly set to rule that it does promote "partisan political views" rather than science.

And, while the mandatory disclaimer certainly is good news, Dimmock's attorney, John Day, nailed it when he said:
 "'no amount of turgid guidance' could change the fact that the film is unfit for consumption in the classroom."
Still -- the fact that spoon-feeding it to impressionable children as "settled science" will not be tolerated remains a vital victory for sanity.

Hat Tip: Benny Peiser
A British truck driver who sought to stop the documentary An Inconvenient Truth from "brainwashing" his children appears to have won a partial victory.  Although the film will, indeed, be shown in 3,500 schools, teachers will be required to warn students that they're only hearing one side's questionable opinions on global warming.

Stewart Dimmock took the issue to court when he learned that the film he considered "unfit for schools because it is politically biased and contains serious scientific inaccuracies and 'sentimental mush'" was to be force fed to England's secondary school pupils.  The Dover father of two stated at the hearing:
"I wish my children to have the best education possible, free from bias and political spin, and Mr Gore's film falls far short of the standard required."
Having heard testimony that the flick contains "a number of inaccuracies, exaggerations and statements about global warming for which there is currently insufficient scientific evidence", the court is reportedly set to rule that it does promote "partisan political views" rather than science.

And, while the mandatory disclaimer certainly is good news, Dimmock's attorney, John Day, nailed it when he said:
 "'no amount of turgid guidance' could change the fact that the film is unfit for consumption in the classroom."
Still -- the fact that spoon-feeding it to impressionable children as "settled science" will not be tolerated remains a vital victory for sanity.

Hat Tip: Benny Peiser