McCain: No Muslim President

Rick Moran
When John F. Kennedy ran for President in 1960, there were serious questions about his viability among many protestants due to his Catholic faith.

In the end, Kennedy challenged the nation to vote for him not because he was a Catholic but in spite of his religion. He challenged people to prove how tolerant they were.

John McCain has apparently taken the
opposite tack:


GOP presidential candidate John McCain says America is better off with a Christian President and he doesn't want a Muslim in the Oval Office. "I admire the Islam. There's a lot of good principles in it," he said. "But I just have to say in all candor that since this nation was founded primarily on Christian principles, personally, I prefer someone who I know who has a solid grounding in my faith."
Not surprisingly, CAIR jumped on the Senator's remarks immediately:
"That kind of attitude goes against the American tradition of religious pluralism and inclusion," said Ibrahim Hooper, spokesman for the Council on American-Islamic Relations. He urged McCain to "clarify his remarks" and "stress his acceptance of political candidates of any faith."
For once, I am forced to agree with CAIR. The Senator's comments were outrageous - something he obviously realized when he clarified his remarks later:
McCain later clarified his remarks, saying, "I would vote for a Muslim if he or she was the candidate best able to lead the country and to defend our political values."
McCain did grant that he would vote for a Mormon. "I've known so many people of the Mormon faith who have been so magnificent," he said. But his comment about America being a Christian nation probably fell a little flat with Jewish voters.

This kind of pandering to the Christian right is simply wrong. It unnecessarily insults Americans of other faiths who happen not to be Christian and calls into question the Senator's judgement.

Remarkably stupid comments....
When John F. Kennedy ran for President in 1960, there were serious questions about his viability among many protestants due to his Catholic faith.

In the end, Kennedy challenged the nation to vote for him not because he was a Catholic but in spite of his religion. He challenged people to prove how tolerant they were.

John McCain has apparently taken the
opposite tack:


GOP presidential candidate John McCain says America is better off with a Christian President and he doesn't want a Muslim in the Oval Office. "I admire the Islam. There's a lot of good principles in it," he said. "But I just have to say in all candor that since this nation was founded primarily on Christian principles, personally, I prefer someone who I know who has a solid grounding in my faith."
Not surprisingly, CAIR jumped on the Senator's remarks immediately:
"That kind of attitude goes against the American tradition of religious pluralism and inclusion," said Ibrahim Hooper, spokesman for the Council on American-Islamic Relations. He urged McCain to "clarify his remarks" and "stress his acceptance of political candidates of any faith."
For once, I am forced to agree with CAIR. The Senator's comments were outrageous - something he obviously realized when he clarified his remarks later:
McCain later clarified his remarks, saying, "I would vote for a Muslim if he or she was the candidate best able to lead the country and to defend our political values."
McCain did grant that he would vote for a Mormon. "I've known so many people of the Mormon faith who have been so magnificent," he said. But his comment about America being a Christian nation probably fell a little flat with Jewish voters.

This kind of pandering to the Christian right is simply wrong. It unnecessarily insults Americans of other faiths who happen not to be Christian and calls into question the Senator's judgement.

Remarkably stupid comments....