The New York Times Whitewashes Another Islamic Extremist

Two statements in this  New YorkTimes article today on the "resignation" of the principal (Debbie Almontaser) of New York City's planned Arabic school stand out for their use of manipulating language to whitewash the extremism of Ms. Almontaser. In the article about her resignation in the wake of her promotion of the sale of T-shirts printed with "Intifada-NYC" on them to the students of the school, there are these two statements.
Ms. Almontaser’s remarks, made last weekend, were in response to questions from The Post over the phrase “Intifada NYC,” which was printed on T-shirts sold by Arab Women Active in the Arts and Media, a Brooklyn-based organization.

The shirts have no relation to her school. Education officials tried to tamp down the situation, saying Ms. Almontaser had no direct connection to the Brooklyn group.
This is deceptive and manipulative on the part of the New York Times. The fact that she, as principal, was promoting the T-shirts to school students means there was a tie to the school because she, as the principal of the school and as the person most publicized with the school, becomes (in essence) a symbol of the school. More importantly, the second sentence is disgraceful. Almontaser shares office space with the group printing and promoting the T-shirts. To write that she has "no direction to the Brooklyn Group" is a lie. This is particularly notable because with in the body of the article the issue of the Arabic school sharing space in a building with a public school is highlighted (along with the controversy this sharing of space has generated). Clearly, the Times realizes that sharing not just a building, but OFFICE SPACE, would be of interest to its readers. Instead the paper deliberately ignores the fact that Almontaser shares OFFICE SPACE with the group-thereby completely eliminating the fact (to its readers, anyway) that she does indeed have ties to this group.

One more example of the Times deliberately manipulating the news to promote an agenda.
Two statements in this  New YorkTimes article today on the "resignation" of the principal (Debbie Almontaser) of New York City's planned Arabic school stand out for their use of manipulating language to whitewash the extremism of Ms. Almontaser. In the article about her resignation in the wake of her promotion of the sale of T-shirts printed with "Intifada-NYC" on them to the students of the school, there are these two statements.
Ms. Almontaser’s remarks, made last weekend, were in response to questions from The Post over the phrase “Intifada NYC,” which was printed on T-shirts sold by Arab Women Active in the Arts and Media, a Brooklyn-based organization.

The shirts have no relation to her school. Education officials tried to tamp down the situation, saying Ms. Almontaser had no direct connection to the Brooklyn group.
This is deceptive and manipulative on the part of the New York Times. The fact that she, as principal, was promoting the T-shirts to school students means there was a tie to the school because she, as the principal of the school and as the person most publicized with the school, becomes (in essence) a symbol of the school. More importantly, the second sentence is disgraceful. Almontaser shares office space with the group printing and promoting the T-shirts. To write that she has "no direction to the Brooklyn Group" is a lie. This is particularly notable because with in the body of the article the issue of the Arabic school sharing space in a building with a public school is highlighted (along with the controversy this sharing of space has generated). Clearly, the Times realizes that sharing not just a building, but OFFICE SPACE, would be of interest to its readers. Instead the paper deliberately ignores the fact that Almontaser shares OFFICE SPACE with the group-thereby completely eliminating the fact (to its readers, anyway) that she does indeed have ties to this group.

One more example of the Times deliberately manipulating the news to promote an agenda.