Tears and Jeers For Rove

Rick Moran
The media has been in a feeding frenzy over the last 24 hours, ever since Karl Rove announced that he was leaving the White House at the end of the month.

One thing is sure; there is not a lack of opinions on Rove's impact, his character, or the job he did in serving the President these many years. Some reaction on the left has bordered on apoplexy.

The New York Times believes that Rove should not escape the clutches of congressional investigators:
Karl Rove, the architect of so much that has gone so wrong with the Bush administration, announced yesterday that he is leaving the White House to spend more time with his family.

What he didn’t say is that by getting out of town he is also hoping to avoid spending any time at all with Congressional investigators.

Congress should not oblige. The American public needs to understand the full story of how this White House — with Mr. Rove pulling many of the strings — has spent the last six and a half years improperly and dangerously politicizing the federal government.

Mr. Rove is already defying one Congressional subpoena to testify about the United States attorneys scandal. He should be made to respond to that one, and should also be subpoenaed to explain his role in several other cases of crass politicization.
Bill Plante of CBS News, proving that Rove Derangement Syndrom isn't confined to left wing blogs, screamed this at the President after he embraced Rove following their mid day presser:

"If he's so smart, how come you lost Congress?"


Perhaps someone should ask Mr. Plante if he was so smart, how come he's with the lowest rated, joke of a news broadcast in all of Christendom?

President Bush himself was fulsome in his praise of his life long friend:
This is a family that has made enormous sacrifices not only for our beloved Texas, but for a country we both love. We have been friends for a long time. And we’re still going to be friends. I’d call Karl Rove a dear friend.

We’ve known each other as youngsters interested in serving our state. We worked together so that we could be in a position to serve our country. So I thank my friend. I’ll be on the road behind you here in a little bit. I thank Darby and I thank Karl for making a tremendous sacrifice and I wish you all the very best.
Few presidential aides have been vilified quite like Rove was during his years in the White House. The executive mansion will be a much different place without him.
The media has been in a feeding frenzy over the last 24 hours, ever since Karl Rove announced that he was leaving the White House at the end of the month.

One thing is sure; there is not a lack of opinions on Rove's impact, his character, or the job he did in serving the President these many years. Some reaction on the left has bordered on apoplexy.

The New York Times believes that Rove should not escape the clutches of congressional investigators:
Karl Rove, the architect of so much that has gone so wrong with the Bush administration, announced yesterday that he is leaving the White House to spend more time with his family.

What he didn’t say is that by getting out of town he is also hoping to avoid spending any time at all with Congressional investigators.

Congress should not oblige. The American public needs to understand the full story of how this White House — with Mr. Rove pulling many of the strings — has spent the last six and a half years improperly and dangerously politicizing the federal government.

Mr. Rove is already defying one Congressional subpoena to testify about the United States attorneys scandal. He should be made to respond to that one, and should also be subpoenaed to explain his role in several other cases of crass politicization.
Bill Plante of CBS News, proving that Rove Derangement Syndrom isn't confined to left wing blogs, screamed this at the President after he embraced Rove following their mid day presser:

"If he's so smart, how come you lost Congress?"


Perhaps someone should ask Mr. Plante if he was so smart, how come he's with the lowest rated, joke of a news broadcast in all of Christendom?

President Bush himself was fulsome in his praise of his life long friend:
This is a family that has made enormous sacrifices not only for our beloved Texas, but for a country we both love. We have been friends for a long time. And we’re still going to be friends. I’d call Karl Rove a dear friend.

We’ve known each other as youngsters interested in serving our state. We worked together so that we could be in a position to serve our country. So I thank my friend. I’ll be on the road behind you here in a little bit. I thank Darby and I thank Karl for making a tremendous sacrifice and I wish you all the very best.
Few presidential aides have been vilified quite like Rove was during his years in the White House. The executive mansion will be a much different place without him.