Russian Bomb Dropped on Georgia

Douglas Hanson
Russian President Vladimir Putin must indeed be in a very bad mood .

The Times (UK) Online
is reporting  that two Russian fighter bombers, possibly of the SU type, crossed over into Republic of Georgia airspace on Monday night and let loose with a 1000kg precision guided munition. The bomb landed about 80 kilometers form the capital of Tbilisi and just missed the village of Tsitelubani. Fortunately, the bomb failed to detonate. The Georgian military has deployed to the area and an examination of the bomb is on going by Georgian forces and the OSCE (Organisation of Security and Cooperation in Europe).

Naturally, Moscow has denied the entire affair, but makes no excuses for its opposition to Georgia's and other former Soviet Republics' split from the old communist regime and Putin's current incarnation of the Russian empire. Under different circumstances, this incident could have been blamed on shoddy navigation or plain carelessness. But it would be an understatement to say that events over the last year or so between the two countries has been tense. This has been the second violation of Georgian airspace by russian military aircraft in the last five months, their mutual border has been closed and air links have been cut. Putin also banned the import of wine - one of Georgia's primary commodities and source of national pride - in an attempt to add insult to injury. Georgia intends to bring the matter before the UN Security Council, where hopefully, more facts will come out concernng this incident.
Russian President Vladimir Putin must indeed be in a very bad mood .

The Times (UK) Online
is reporting  that two Russian fighter bombers, possibly of the SU type, crossed over into Republic of Georgia airspace on Monday night and let loose with a 1000kg precision guided munition. The bomb landed about 80 kilometers form the capital of Tbilisi and just missed the village of Tsitelubani. Fortunately, the bomb failed to detonate. The Georgian military has deployed to the area and an examination of the bomb is on going by Georgian forces and the OSCE (Organisation of Security and Cooperation in Europe).

Naturally, Moscow has denied the entire affair, but makes no excuses for its opposition to Georgia's and other former Soviet Republics' split from the old communist regime and Putin's current incarnation of the Russian empire. Under different circumstances, this incident could have been blamed on shoddy navigation or plain carelessness. But it would be an understatement to say that events over the last year or so between the two countries has been tense. This has been the second violation of Georgian airspace by russian military aircraft in the last five months, their mutual border has been closed and air links have been cut. Putin also banned the import of wine - one of Georgia's primary commodities and source of national pride - in an attempt to add insult to injury. Georgia intends to bring the matter before the UN Security Council, where hopefully, more facts will come out concernng this incident.