How to fight a propaganda war against America

Gen. Ion Mihai Pacepa is the highest-ranking intelligence official ever to have defected from the Soviet bloc. Someone who knows first hand the ins and outs of fighting the propaganda war against America. In a stunning op-ed on Opiniojournal.com today, he points a finger directly at today's anti-war/anti-Bush movement for aiding the enemy.

I spent decades scrutinizing the U.S. from Europe, and I learned that international respect for America is directly proportional to America's own respect for its president.
He outlines a brief history of Soviet efforts to fight America by discrediting her presidents, showing how the game worked.
Sowing the seeds of anti-Americanism by discrediting the American president was one of the main tasks of the Soviet-bloc intelligence community during the years I worked at its top levels. This same strategy is at work today, but it is regarded as bad manners to point out the Soviet parallels. [....]

The final goal of our anti-American offensive was to discourage the U.S. from protecting the world against communist terrorism and expansion. Sadly, we succeeded. After U.S. forces precipitously pulled out of Vietnam, the victorious communists massacred some two million people in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. Another million tried to escape, but many died in the attempt. This tragedy also created a credibility gap between America and the rest of the world, damaged the cohesion of American foreign policy, and poisoned domestic debate in the U.S.

Unfortunately, partisans today have taken a page from the old Soviet playbook.
The reckoning never arrived for those who sabotaged America's efforts in Vietnam. The victims were dead and injured Cambodians, Vietnamese, and Laotians, and their suffering was of little concern to media elites. In the current war, the victim groups will not be so circumscribed, and we face a foe fighting on a global front.

Hat tip: Tantor
Gen. Ion Mihai Pacepa is the highest-ranking intelligence official ever to have defected from the Soviet bloc. Someone who knows first hand the ins and outs of fighting the propaganda war against America. In a stunning op-ed on Opiniojournal.com today, he points a finger directly at today's anti-war/anti-Bush movement for aiding the enemy.

I spent decades scrutinizing the U.S. from Europe, and I learned that international respect for America is directly proportional to America's own respect for its president.
He outlines a brief history of Soviet efforts to fight America by discrediting her presidents, showing how the game worked.
Sowing the seeds of anti-Americanism by discrediting the American president was one of the main tasks of the Soviet-bloc intelligence community during the years I worked at its top levels. This same strategy is at work today, but it is regarded as bad manners to point out the Soviet parallels. [....]

The final goal of our anti-American offensive was to discourage the U.S. from protecting the world against communist terrorism and expansion. Sadly, we succeeded. After U.S. forces precipitously pulled out of Vietnam, the victorious communists massacred some two million people in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. Another million tried to escape, but many died in the attempt. This tragedy also created a credibility gap between America and the rest of the world, damaged the cohesion of American foreign policy, and poisoned domestic debate in the U.S.

Unfortunately, partisans today have taken a page from the old Soviet playbook.
The reckoning never arrived for those who sabotaged America's efforts in Vietnam. The victims were dead and injured Cambodians, Vietnamese, and Laotians, and their suffering was of little concern to media elites. In the current war, the victim groups will not be so circumscribed, and we face a foe fighting on a global front.

Hat tip: Tantor