Ames Fallout Claims a Candidate

Rick Moran
The results of the Ames straw poll last Saturday have led to one of the candidates throwing in the towel and dropping out of the race.

Former Wisconsin governor Tommy Thompson finished far back in the pack, garnering around 6% of the vote. Promising to reassess his campaign if he didn't finish at least second in the contest, Thompson has announced his is quitting the race:
Speaking to reporters Sunday, he smiled and said he simply needed to accept that he "lost."

"There's no sense in looking back," he said. "I felt my record as governor of Wisconsin and Secretary of Health and Human Services gave me the experience I needed to serve as president," he said.

"But I respect the decision of the voters. I am leaving the campaign trail today, but I will not leave the challenges of improving health care and welfare in America."
Thompson is an idea man. Some of his policy prescriptions, soundly based on conservative principles, will probably find their way into the next Republican Administration. His health insurance proposals especially deserve to be examined in a serious manner.

But he had very little to recommend him to the job of President besides some good ideas. He was never able to ignite people's enthusiasm for his candidacy which, in a crowded field, is absolutely essential in order to break away from the pack. He was a boring speaker, very little "color" to his personality, and could come off as kind of preachy at times.

It is possible, though unlikely, that he would be considered for the vice presidency by most of the front runners. It is more likely that he would once again fill a cabinet position in a Republican Administration. He is honest, forthright, and evidently a good administrator - qualities that are hard to find in either party these days.

The results of the Ames straw poll last Saturday have led to one of the candidates throwing in the towel and dropping out of the race.

Former Wisconsin governor Tommy Thompson finished far back in the pack, garnering around 6% of the vote. Promising to reassess his campaign if he didn't finish at least second in the contest, Thompson has announced his is quitting the race:
Speaking to reporters Sunday, he smiled and said he simply needed to accept that he "lost."

"There's no sense in looking back," he said. "I felt my record as governor of Wisconsin and Secretary of Health and Human Services gave me the experience I needed to serve as president," he said.

"But I respect the decision of the voters. I am leaving the campaign trail today, but I will not leave the challenges of improving health care and welfare in America."
Thompson is an idea man. Some of his policy prescriptions, soundly based on conservative principles, will probably find their way into the next Republican Administration. His health insurance proposals especially deserve to be examined in a serious manner.

But he had very little to recommend him to the job of President besides some good ideas. He was never able to ignite people's enthusiasm for his candidacy which, in a crowded field, is absolutely essential in order to break away from the pack. He was a boring speaker, very little "color" to his personality, and could come off as kind of preachy at times.

It is possible, though unlikely, that he would be considered for the vice presidency by most of the front runners. It is more likely that he would once again fill a cabinet position in a Republican Administration. He is honest, forthright, and evidently a good administrator - qualities that are hard to find in either party these days.