Vitter's troubles may benefit Landrieu

Dan Gordon and Richard Baehr
David Vitter's madam troubles – play-for-pay companions in two cities, it appears today (with a Larry Flynt press conference to pile on tonight), will not force him to resign, but they may help Democrat Mary Landrieu in her re-election bid  next year. Landrieu was one of two endangered Democratic senators in he 2008 cycle (Tim Johnson of South Dakota the other, if he runs again).  With the departure of about half of New Orleans’ residents, demographic changes alone (loss of many black voters) could have resulted in her defeat (Landrieu has won two races very narrowly). 
Now, there may be a reaction to the perceived social agenda hypocrisy of the GOP in the state. Vitter was first GOP Senator elected from Louisiana in over a century.
David Vitter's madam troubles – play-for-pay companions in two cities, it appears today (with a Larry Flynt press conference to pile on tonight), will not force him to resign, but they may help Democrat Mary Landrieu in her re-election bid  next year. Landrieu was one of two endangered Democratic senators in he 2008 cycle (Tim Johnson of South Dakota the other, if he runs again).  With the departure of about half of New Orleans’ residents, demographic changes alone (loss of many black voters) could have resulted in her defeat (Landrieu has won two races very narrowly). 
Now, there may be a reaction to the perceived social agenda hypocrisy of the GOP in the state. Vitter was first GOP Senator elected from Louisiana in over a century.