The Times, It Ain't A Changin'

Two pages, 1375 words, and not one bit of analysis from the NYT of the potential synergies of a successful News Corp buyout of Dow Jones & Co. Combining the WSJ with Murdoch's new 24/7 financial cable news channel will allow the media mogul to generate combined advertising packages any way he sees fit, making the WSJ considerably more immune to losses in ad revenues than say, the New York Times or any other stand-alone dead-tree MSM outlet. 

Instead, the Times focuses on the decline of newspaper advertising, but the all too obvious lack of self-inclusion as per the over all gloom and doom therein is quite remarkable. Of course, mentioning synergies between cable TV and newspapering would bring up the awkward retreat of the New York Times Company from its own cable venture, the DiscoveryTimes Channel.

I guarantee you, if Ron Burkle or some other progressive billionaire/s had initiated the purchase of Dow Jones & Co., the Times would be proclaiming it a historic media milestone, sparing future generations the loss of experiencing their daily news vis-à-vis at least three of their five senses (four if you count one's intuitive ability to read between the lines) thanks to the perspicacious business acumen of said progressive billionaire/s (not to be confused with robber barons and monopolistic conservative capitalists).     
Two pages, 1375 words, and not one bit of analysis from the NYT of the potential synergies of a successful News Corp buyout of Dow Jones & Co. Combining the WSJ with Murdoch's new 24/7 financial cable news channel will allow the media mogul to generate combined advertising packages any way he sees fit, making the WSJ considerably more immune to losses in ad revenues than say, the New York Times or any other stand-alone dead-tree MSM outlet. 

Instead, the Times focuses on the decline of newspaper advertising, but the all too obvious lack of self-inclusion as per the over all gloom and doom therein is quite remarkable. Of course, mentioning synergies between cable TV and newspapering would bring up the awkward retreat of the New York Times Company from its own cable venture, the DiscoveryTimes Channel.

I guarantee you, if Ron Burkle or some other progressive billionaire/s had initiated the purchase of Dow Jones & Co., the Times would be proclaiming it a historic media milestone, sparing future generations the loss of experiencing their daily news vis-à-vis at least three of their five senses (four if you count one's intuitive ability to read between the lines) thanks to the perspicacious business acumen of said progressive billionaire/s (not to be confused with robber barons and monopolistic conservative capitalists).