The perfect justice of Sharia strikes again

Thomas Lifson
Sharia law has led an unfortunate woman in India to suicide. The Telegraph of India brings us the story. Tarzina Khatun was a woman in the village of Malda, who was unable to conceive a child by her husband Motiur, even after more than five years of marriage. So of course he gave her a pink slip via the talaq option.  Just say "Talq, talaq, talaq" (I divorce you, I divorce you, I divorce you"), and you are free.

Sorry ladies, this only works for males. But it is perfect justice among the Sunnis.

After a few days, Motiur changed his mind, though, and wanted Tarzina back. Unfortunately, the Quran does not allow re-marriage so easily. So, as told by her brother, here is what happened:

"We sat together and decided after conferring with the clerics that Tarzina would have to stay all by herself for three months and then marry a different person and spend at least one night with him. According to the shariat, she could then divorce the new husband and remarry Motiur. But she refused," Bablu said.

Tarzina had also approached the Chanchol police and in a written complaint said she was not willing to marry anyone else except her former husband.

Police sources said they had gone to the village and sat with the couple's families, asking them to sort out the matter amicably. Both families then decided that the shariat had to be followed.

"No Muslim can shun the religious law and Tarzina had to abide by it," said Farizuddin Ahmed, a resident of Imampur.

Bablu said his family had even convinced a youth from the village to marry Tarzina for a day. "All she had to do was spend one night with him and divorce him the next day. But my sister refused to consider the proposal and killed herself," an inconsolable Bablu said.

This morning Tarzina's body was found in a room in her parents' house. She had consumed pesticide meant for eggplants.

Sharia law is resurgent in many parts of the world not traditionally governed by it (northern Nigeria) and is demanded by Muslims (Malaysia).  Sharia was even proposed to be applied in family courts in Ontario (though this was rejected by the province's premier after widespread criticism and demonstrations).

Hat tip: N.S. Rajaram

Sharia law has led an unfortunate woman in India to suicide. The Telegraph of India brings us the story. Tarzina Khatun was a woman in the village of Malda, who was unable to conceive a child by her husband Motiur, even after more than five years of marriage. So of course he gave her a pink slip via the talaq option.  Just say "Talq, talaq, talaq" (I divorce you, I divorce you, I divorce you"), and you are free.

Sorry ladies, this only works for males. But it is perfect justice among the Sunnis.

After a few days, Motiur changed his mind, though, and wanted Tarzina back. Unfortunately, the Quran does not allow re-marriage so easily. So, as told by her brother, here is what happened:

"We sat together and decided after conferring with the clerics that Tarzina would have to stay all by herself for three months and then marry a different person and spend at least one night with him. According to the shariat, she could then divorce the new husband and remarry Motiur. But she refused," Bablu said.

Tarzina had also approached the Chanchol police and in a written complaint said she was not willing to marry anyone else except her former husband.

Police sources said they had gone to the village and sat with the couple's families, asking them to sort out the matter amicably. Both families then decided that the shariat had to be followed.

"No Muslim can shun the religious law and Tarzina had to abide by it," said Farizuddin Ahmed, a resident of Imampur.

Bablu said his family had even convinced a youth from the village to marry Tarzina for a day. "All she had to do was spend one night with him and divorce him the next day. But my sister refused to consider the proposal and killed herself," an inconsolable Bablu said.

This morning Tarzina's body was found in a room in her parents' house. She had consumed pesticide meant for eggplants.

Sharia law is resurgent in many parts of the world not traditionally governed by it (northern Nigeria) and is demanded by Muslims (Malaysia).  Sharia was even proposed to be applied in family courts in Ontario (though this was rejected by the province's premier after widespread criticism and demonstrations).

Hat tip: N.S. Rajaram