Independence Day - more than a day-long celebration

As predictable as night turning into day, July 4th--also known as Independence Day and declared a national holiday by the U.S. Congress in 1870--arrived like clockwork this year. People all over America celebrated much like Philadelphians did on its first anniversary in 1777 with parades, picnics, concerts, fireworks, and now days with appearances by elected politicians.

But did the celebrants understand what is behind all the window dressing of the day? Are they mindful that the holiday celebrates the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, declaring independence from Great Britain? Might the historical importance of the day be fading as love of country is no longer being instilled in children and when history books often present a one-sided and politically correct view of history. Former Secretary of Education William J. Bennett wrote recently: "How do we ask our children to fight, and perhaps die, for a country they do not know?"

Many wars have been fought since America gained its independence from Great Britain in the aftermath of the Revolutionary War. Since then America has endured much controversy. She has suffered, struggled, overcome adversary, won and lost battles and has yet managed throughout this nation's history to keep freedom alive. But freedom is not automatic. It can be lost if the public no longer believes that freedom is a cherished concept that requires sacrifice and work.

Will freedom continue to survive for future generations of Americans when public disenchantment of the Iraq war is being fueled by a mainstream media that promotes death, destruction and defeat; when politicians seem determined to declare defeat and advocate the withdrawal of troops; and when a judicial system seems intent on systematically chipping away at the tools necessary to fight a war that does not involve a nation, but a radical ideology that seeks to subjugate freedom-loving countries in the name of Islam under harsh Shariah or Islamic law? Britain had an recent awakening despite the thwarting of three linked terrorist attacks. Even if the terrorists were home-grown, their acts were al-Queda-inspired and their impact was massive on British society. May this nation be vigilant of similar activity here. It is not only a British problem but a global one.

Pulling out of Iraq would not serve America's interests. Instead, it would place freedom and the survival of this nation in jeopardy. Cal Thomas in a recent commentary stated: It (the Iraq war) is an unending war, at least until one side vanquishes the other side." May America and the West be the victors, so the torch of freedom will continue to shine brightly and the dark threat of Islamic fundamentalism will no longer lie in wait to dismantle the freedom we cherish as Americans.
As predictable as night turning into day, July 4th--also known as Independence Day and declared a national holiday by the U.S. Congress in 1870--arrived like clockwork this year. People all over America celebrated much like Philadelphians did on its first anniversary in 1777 with parades, picnics, concerts, fireworks, and now days with appearances by elected politicians.

But did the celebrants understand what is behind all the window dressing of the day? Are they mindful that the holiday celebrates the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, declaring independence from Great Britain? Might the historical importance of the day be fading as love of country is no longer being instilled in children and when history books often present a one-sided and politically correct view of history. Former Secretary of Education William J. Bennett wrote recently: "How do we ask our children to fight, and perhaps die, for a country they do not know?"

Many wars have been fought since America gained its independence from Great Britain in the aftermath of the Revolutionary War. Since then America has endured much controversy. She has suffered, struggled, overcome adversary, won and lost battles and has yet managed throughout this nation's history to keep freedom alive. But freedom is not automatic. It can be lost if the public no longer believes that freedom is a cherished concept that requires sacrifice and work.

Will freedom continue to survive for future generations of Americans when public disenchantment of the Iraq war is being fueled by a mainstream media that promotes death, destruction and defeat; when politicians seem determined to declare defeat and advocate the withdrawal of troops; and when a judicial system seems intent on systematically chipping away at the tools necessary to fight a war that does not involve a nation, but a radical ideology that seeks to subjugate freedom-loving countries in the name of Islam under harsh Shariah or Islamic law? Britain had an recent awakening despite the thwarting of three linked terrorist attacks. Even if the terrorists were home-grown, their acts were al-Queda-inspired and their impact was massive on British society. May this nation be vigilant of similar activity here. It is not only a British problem but a global one.

Pulling out of Iraq would not serve America's interests. Instead, it would place freedom and the survival of this nation in jeopardy. Cal Thomas in a recent commentary stated: It (the Iraq war) is an unending war, at least until one side vanquishes the other side." May America and the West be the victors, so the torch of freedom will continue to shine brightly and the dark threat of Islamic fundamentalism will no longer lie in wait to dismantle the freedom we cherish as Americans.