Fitzgerald to testify?

Clarice Feldman
John Hughes of Bloomberg reports that Sen. Leahy says that Patrick Fitzgerald may testify before Congress on his prosecution of the Libby Case.
U.S. attorney Fitzgerald may be called to testify about his prosecution of a former vice presidential aide, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, Senator Leahy of Vermont said.

Mr. Leahy, the Judiciary Committee chairman, and Senator Specter, the ranking Republican on the panel, indicated that they want to discuss sentencing guidelines in light of President Bush's commutation of Libby's sentence and also to quiz Mr. Fitzgerald on his handling of the case.

"I still haven't figured out what that case is all about," Mr. Specter said. "There are a lot of ramifications that I think we ought to go into. Why were they pursuing the matter long after there was no underlying crime on the outing of the CIA agent? Why were they pursuing it after we knew who the leaker was?"

Mr. Leahy, appearing with Mr. Specter of Pennsylvania on CNN's "Late Edition," noted they both are former prosecutors and said he has "some of the very same questions in mind." Smiling, he added: "You might find it to be an interesting hearing."
This is just more BS. I doubt Fitz will agree to testify. Actually, I'd like to get Schumer and Comey under oath though.

John Hughes of Bloomberg reports that Sen. Leahy says that Patrick Fitzgerald may testify before Congress on his prosecution of the Libby Case.
U.S. attorney Fitzgerald may be called to testify about his prosecution of a former vice presidential aide, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, Senator Leahy of Vermont said.

Mr. Leahy, the Judiciary Committee chairman, and Senator Specter, the ranking Republican on the panel, indicated that they want to discuss sentencing guidelines in light of President Bush's commutation of Libby's sentence and also to quiz Mr. Fitzgerald on his handling of the case.

"I still haven't figured out what that case is all about," Mr. Specter said. "There are a lot of ramifications that I think we ought to go into. Why were they pursuing the matter long after there was no underlying crime on the outing of the CIA agent? Why were they pursuing it after we knew who the leaker was?"

Mr. Leahy, appearing with Mr. Specter of Pennsylvania on CNN's "Late Edition," noted they both are former prosecutors and said he has "some of the very same questions in mind." Smiling, he added: "You might find it to be an interesting hearing."
This is just more BS. I doubt Fitz will agree to testify. Actually, I'd like to get Schumer and Comey under oath though.