D Day plus 63 years

John B. Dwyer
June 6 is a sacred anniversary, the commemoration of one of the greatest invasions in human history, D-Day at Normandy. Brave Allied troops waded ashore amidst withering machine gun fire and artillery, dying by the thousands in order to secure the beachhead and lay the basis for the western front and the drive into Germany. It was incomparably bloody beyond anything we have encountered in Iraq.

There is so much for us to remember about this act of mass heroism. Fortunately, there is a vast array of information available to those who wish to learn more.

Here are links to information about the D-Day contributions of the Army, Army Air Force, Navy and Coast Guard. 

http://www.worldwar2history.info/

http://www.d-daymuseum.org/education/factsheets_history.html

http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq109-1.htm

http://www.aero-web.org/history/wwii/d-day/toc.htm

http://www.uscg.mil/history/h_normandy.html

http://www.uscg.mil/history/Normandy_Index.html


All but the Army Air Force sites contain oral histories, though I'm sure that with further searching those most compelling accounts can be found.  It may come as news to some that the Coast Guard participated in the Normandy landings.  USCG crews manned big attack transports and LCI(L)s, large infantry landing craft, who put men & equipment ashore.

Twelve Amy men earned the Medal of Honor on that day, 8 of them posthumously (see this link). To honor them all, we should read and learn as much as possible about their valor and sacrifice, even as WW2 veterans are dying in great numbers - and to never forget them. 
June 6 is a sacred anniversary, the commemoration of one of the greatest invasions in human history, D-Day at Normandy. Brave Allied troops waded ashore amidst withering machine gun fire and artillery, dying by the thousands in order to secure the beachhead and lay the basis for the western front and the drive into Germany. It was incomparably bloody beyond anything we have encountered in Iraq.

There is so much for us to remember about this act of mass heroism. Fortunately, there is a vast array of information available to those who wish to learn more.

Here are links to information about the D-Day contributions of the Army, Army Air Force, Navy and Coast Guard. 

http://www.worldwar2history.info/

http://www.d-daymuseum.org/education/factsheets_history.html

http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq109-1.htm

http://www.aero-web.org/history/wwii/d-day/toc.htm

http://www.uscg.mil/history/h_normandy.html

http://www.uscg.mil/history/Normandy_Index.html


All but the Army Air Force sites contain oral histories, though I'm sure that with further searching those most compelling accounts can be found.  It may come as news to some that the Coast Guard participated in the Normandy landings.  USCG crews manned big attack transports and LCI(L)s, large infantry landing craft, who put men & equipment ashore.

Twelve Amy men earned the Medal of Honor on that day, 8 of them posthumously (see this link). To honor them all, we should read and learn as much as possible about their valor and sacrifice, even as WW2 veterans are dying in great numbers - and to never forget them.