BBC: 'evangelical SCHEMES' entering the cells of US prisons

In a story headlined "Jesus and jail: Should evangelical schemes enter the cells of US prisons?", The BBC hyperventilates on the threat of prison inmates following the peaceful path of Jesus.
Supporters of President George W Bush say it's one of his greatest achievements: encouraging religious organisations to help with the provision of basic social services.

The White House has doled out millions of dollars of public funding to these bodies - many of them representing evangelical Christians.

But in one area an effort is being made in the courts to stop the practice.
How is that for a headline and perspective? Schemes connotes underhanded plots and conspiracies undertaken with an evil intent. Of course, it is also a pivot for an attack on George Bush, evangelical Christians, and any role of Christian ministries in tending to prisoners. How about a more neutral view using the workd "plans" or "programs"? Ignored by the  all-knowing Beeb is the powerful and often harmful role played by Muslim preachers in US prisons who have served to radicalize prisoners.

Instead, the BBC takes on evangeliclas and their nefarious "schemes". Yep, the BBC, once the world's most trusted news outlet.

Update: Rosslyn Smith writes:

While I am truly loath to defend the BBC,  the headline may be another example of GB Shaw's quip that "England and America are two countries divided by a common language".  
I've noticed in my business correspondence that the British - and those who learn British as opposed to American English - frequently use "scheme" the way we use "plan" or "system".  I remember my surprise the first time I read a memo from a European accountant that asked about the United State's "tax scheme" for a proposed business structure.  I have also reminded European accountants not to use "scheme" in reference to tax planning ideas in correspondence that might be reviewed by our IRS because of the vastly different meaning over here.  Given the tendency for some of our elite to ape British usage and pronunciation as a sign of their sophistication, I have been hoping to see the headline Congress debates latest tax scheme in our media, but alas..... .  
In a story headlined "Jesus and jail: Should evangelical schemes enter the cells of US prisons?", The BBC hyperventilates on the threat of prison inmates following the peaceful path of Jesus.
Supporters of President George W Bush say it's one of his greatest achievements: encouraging religious organisations to help with the provision of basic social services.

The White House has doled out millions of dollars of public funding to these bodies - many of them representing evangelical Christians.

But in one area an effort is being made in the courts to stop the practice.
How is that for a headline and perspective? Schemes connotes underhanded plots and conspiracies undertaken with an evil intent. Of course, it is also a pivot for an attack on George Bush, evangelical Christians, and any role of Christian ministries in tending to prisoners. How about a more neutral view using the workd "plans" or "programs"? Ignored by the  all-knowing Beeb is the powerful and often harmful role played by Muslim preachers in US prisons who have served to radicalize prisoners.

Instead, the BBC takes on evangeliclas and their nefarious "schemes". Yep, the BBC, once the world's most trusted news outlet.

Update: Rosslyn Smith writes:

While I am truly loath to defend the BBC,  the headline may be another example of GB Shaw's quip that "England and America are two countries divided by a common language".  
I've noticed in my business correspondence that the British - and those who learn British as opposed to American English - frequently use "scheme" the way we use "plan" or "system".  I remember my surprise the first time I read a memo from a European accountant that asked about the United State's "tax scheme" for a proposed business structure.  I have also reminded European accountants not to use "scheme" in reference to tax planning ideas in correspondence that might be reviewed by our IRS because of the vastly different meaning over here.  Given the tendency for some of our elite to ape British usage and pronunciation as a sign of their sophistication, I have been hoping to see the headline Congress debates latest tax scheme in our media, but alas..... .