Wolfowitz: corruption-fighter at the World Bank

Bambang Harymurti ,an Indonesian journalist sentenced to jail for his anti-corruption reporting, details how significant the Wolfowitz anti-corruption effort at the World Bank is:
I am quite confident that Mr. Wolfowitz can [handle the challenge], based on how he handled "odious debt" at the World Bank -- the situation in which loans are made with the knowledge that a big chunk of the money will probably be stolen. He did not give in to the pressure from the left to write off odious debt, and he did not give in to the pressure from the right in the opposite direction. His answer was to increase the corruption-prevention and asset-recovery capabilities of poor countries.He has found many champions in this endeavor. Nuhu Ribadu, the chairman of the Economic and Financial Crime Commission of Nigeria, is one. Under his leadership, and with $5 million of assistance from the World Bank, his commission has been able to recover $5 billion worth of stolen assets, and to prevent further aid money from being corrupted. It is not by coincidence that Mr. Ribadu has publicly stated his support for Mr. Wolfowitz to remain the president of the World Bank.
This seems to be a free link, so non-subscribers can read this Wall Street Journal article.
Bambang Harymurti ,an Indonesian journalist sentenced to jail for his anti-corruption reporting, details how significant the Wolfowitz anti-corruption effort at the World Bank is:
I am quite confident that Mr. Wolfowitz can [handle the challenge], based on how he handled "odious debt" at the World Bank -- the situation in which loans are made with the knowledge that a big chunk of the money will probably be stolen. He did not give in to the pressure from the left to write off odious debt, and he did not give in to the pressure from the right in the opposite direction. His answer was to increase the corruption-prevention and asset-recovery capabilities of poor countries.He has found many champions in this endeavor. Nuhu Ribadu, the chairman of the Economic and Financial Crime Commission of Nigeria, is one. Under his leadership, and with $5 million of assistance from the World Bank, his commission has been able to recover $5 billion worth of stolen assets, and to prevent further aid money from being corrupted. It is not by coincidence that Mr. Ribadu has publicly stated his support for Mr. Wolfowitz to remain the president of the World Bank.
This seems to be a free link, so non-subscribers can read this Wall Street Journal article.