The Kennedy-Bush Immigration Travesty

Out-of-control immigration represents the greatest existential challenge of our time.  By "existential challenge," I mean a public policy problem that goes to the heart of what it means to be "American" and which threatens to fundamentally, and perhaps permanently, alter American society for the worse.  Everyone agrees that "something needs to be done" about the immigration problem.  Yes, there are strong disagreements over what that "something" should be.  But few Americans believe that what we need to do is enshrine the current broken situation into law.

Yet that is exactly what the comprehensive immigration bill  agreed upon last week by a bipartisan group of Senators, led by the Svengali Ted Kennedy, and the misguided Bush Administration, promises to do.

As numerous commentators already have warned, the proposed legislation will offer amnesty to millions of illegal aliens currently living in the United States -- something both Democrats and big business Republicans want, Democrats because these future voters will overwhelmingly support the Democratic Party and its welfare state agenda, big business Republicans because they want to be able to employ low-cost immigrant labor without any legal repercussions.  In addition, the bill establishes a "guest worker" program to import hundreds of thousands more poor, uneducated, low-paid workers -- again, something both Democrats and big business Republicans want, for the reasons just given.  Lastly, the bill provides for increased border security -- something ordinary Americans want -- desperately -- but which we all know will never happen under our current federal leadership.  Until our political and economic elites take border control as seriously as the rest of us do, millions of illegals will continue to stream across the border looking for work and waiting for the next round of "legalization."

Not surprisingly, the supporters of the bill want to push it through Congress and onto the President's desk as quickly as possible, before the public -- especially Middle Americans of both parties -- grasps the magnitude of the bill's baleful impact on our society, our economy, and our politics.

This bill must be defeated.  As unacceptable as the status quo is, it is far preferable to the future scenario envisioned by the Kennedy-Bush immigration bill: an increasingly Hispanicized country, divided between rich and poor, with a stagnant working class, and dominated by a political coalition that ever seeks to expand the power of the federal government over our daily lives.  Indeed, the demographic changes wrought by this bill are likely to make a meaningful conservative movement in this country -- one dedicated to the traditional American principles of limited government, private property, free enterprise, personal responsibility, strong national defense, and patriotism -- a practical impossibility.

For excellent commentary on the Kennedy-Bush bill, see Mark Steyn, Steve Sailer , "Anonymous" on National Review , David Frum , and Debbie Schlussel.


Out-of-control immigration represents the greatest existential challenge of our time.  By "existential challenge," I mean a public policy problem that goes to the heart of what it means to be "American" and which threatens to fundamentally, and perhaps permanently, alter American society for the worse.  Everyone agrees that "something needs to be done" about the immigration problem.  Yes, there are strong disagreements over what that "something" should be.  But few Americans believe that what we need to do is enshrine the current broken situation into law.

Yet that is exactly what the comprehensive immigration bill  agreed upon last week by a bipartisan group of Senators, led by the Svengali Ted Kennedy, and the misguided Bush Administration, promises to do.

As numerous commentators already have warned, the proposed legislation will offer amnesty to millions of illegal aliens currently living in the United States -- something both Democrats and big business Republicans want, Democrats because these future voters will overwhelmingly support the Democratic Party and its welfare state agenda, big business Republicans because they want to be able to employ low-cost immigrant labor without any legal repercussions.  In addition, the bill establishes a "guest worker" program to import hundreds of thousands more poor, uneducated, low-paid workers -- again, something both Democrats and big business Republicans want, for the reasons just given.  Lastly, the bill provides for increased border security -- something ordinary Americans want -- desperately -- but which we all know will never happen under our current federal leadership.  Until our political and economic elites take border control as seriously as the rest of us do, millions of illegals will continue to stream across the border looking for work and waiting for the next round of "legalization."

Not surprisingly, the supporters of the bill want to push it through Congress and onto the President's desk as quickly as possible, before the public -- especially Middle Americans of both parties -- grasps the magnitude of the bill's baleful impact on our society, our economy, and our politics.

This bill must be defeated.  As unacceptable as the status quo is, it is far preferable to the future scenario envisioned by the Kennedy-Bush immigration bill: an increasingly Hispanicized country, divided between rich and poor, with a stagnant working class, and dominated by a political coalition that ever seeks to expand the power of the federal government over our daily lives.  Indeed, the demographic changes wrought by this bill are likely to make a meaningful conservative movement in this country -- one dedicated to the traditional American principles of limited government, private property, free enterprise, personal responsibility, strong national defense, and patriotism -- a practical impossibility.

For excellent commentary on the Kennedy-Bush bill, see Mark Steyn, Steve Sailer , "Anonymous" on National Review , David Frum , and Debbie Schlussel.