Missing Headlines: Sen. Frist vindicated

Senator Frist was hounded by charges that he had engaged in insider trading when he sold shares of the company his family founded, Hospital Corporation of America. Media outlets slandered him with an abandon last seen, well... every day when it comes to people associated with the Bush Administration. But regardless, the charges were trumpeted up by liberal interest groups and a more than willing media.

Now that Senator Frist has been completely cleared of the charges of insider trading, I have not seen this reported anywhere - not in the New York Times, for example. However, at least the editorial page of the Wall Street Journal takes note of Frist's innocence and also of the witch hunt that afflicted him and that seemingly drove him from public life.

Frist may well ponder the question first posed by former U.S. Secretary of Labor Ray Donovan-who, while serving in the Reagan Administration, was also  slandered with charges later proved to be false: "Which office do I go to get my reputation back".

Well it won't be in the offices of the New York Times.
Senator Frist was hounded by charges that he had engaged in insider trading when he sold shares of the company his family founded, Hospital Corporation of America. Media outlets slandered him with an abandon last seen, well... every day when it comes to people associated with the Bush Administration. But regardless, the charges were trumpeted up by liberal interest groups and a more than willing media.

Now that Senator Frist has been completely cleared of the charges of insider trading, I have not seen this reported anywhere - not in the New York Times, for example. However, at least the editorial page of the Wall Street Journal takes note of Frist's innocence and also of the witch hunt that afflicted him and that seemingly drove him from public life.

Frist may well ponder the question first posed by former U.S. Secretary of Labor Ray Donovan-who, while serving in the Reagan Administration, was also  slandered with charges later proved to be false: "Which office do I go to get my reputation back".

Well it won't be in the offices of the New York Times.