Ahmadinejad Charged With "Indecency"

Steven M. Warshawsky
As has been widely reported, in recent weeks "anti-vice" police in Iran have been harassing and arresting thousands of women in that country for violating Iran's strict Islamic dress code, which forbids colorful, revealing clothing (i.e., anything less than being completely covered) and showing too much hair.  We're not talking about a crackdown on Britney Spears look-alikes; even June Cleaver could not satisfy the demands  of the "clothing patrollers" on the streets of Tehran.

In cultures all across the world, women dress in flattering, attractive clothing, and adorn their faces and hair and bodies with make-up and ribbons and jewelry.  It's one of the most basic features, and joys, of human life.  But not under Sharia.  Under Sharia, women must dress in drab sacks of cloth that eliminate their individuality, hide their beauty, and suppress their spirit.  The Sharia manner of dress appears alien and hostile to us precisely because it is contrary to human nature, and the outward mark of a deep and sinister oppression.  Even the most committed "multiculturalist" knows in his gut (even if he won't admit out loud) that there is something profoundly wrong with a society that requires women to wear the hijab or chador or burqa. 

The supposed purpose of the strict Islamic dress code is to protect the "modesty" of both women and men.  As the public prosecutor of Tehran explained:  "These women who appear in public like decadent models [huh?] endanger the security and dignity of young men."  But apparently covering women from head to foot in multiple layers of fabric is not enough to ensure that men behave piously. 

Case in point:  Iran's sabre-rattling president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who was elected in 2005 on a conservative Islamic platform.  Fox News reports  that Ahmadinejad himself has come under fire from Islamic fundamentalists for violating the strictures of Sharia.  At a recent event honoring teachers, Ahmadinejad bowed and kissed an elderly woman's gloved hand and gave her a hug.  Although the woman wore a long black coat, a headscarf, and thick black gloves, Ahmadinejad's actions "prompted charges of indecency by the influential and hard-line Islamic newspaper Hezbollah."

Denying the Holocaust?  That's not indecent.  Supporting terrorism?  That's not indecent.  Pursuing nuclear weapons and threatening to destroy the State of Israel?  That's not indecent, either.  But kissing an old lady's gloved hand?  Now that's indecent! 

What a cold, twisted creed it is that criticizes a man for kissing the gloved hand of an elderly woman, yet applauds when that very same man threatens to destroy another nation.  While this episode may seem trivial, it perfectly illustrates the militant Islamist preference for death over life.  Simple acts of human tenderness are forbidden under Sharia, while killing Jews and Christians and other infidels is commanded by Allah.  So long as Muslims hold to such beliefs, I can't honestly believe that Islam and the West are compatible and can co-exist in peace.

Steven M. Warshawsky  
As has been widely reported, in recent weeks "anti-vice" police in Iran have been harassing and arresting thousands of women in that country for violating Iran's strict Islamic dress code, which forbids colorful, revealing clothing (i.e., anything less than being completely covered) and showing too much hair.  We're not talking about a crackdown on Britney Spears look-alikes; even June Cleaver could not satisfy the demands  of the "clothing patrollers" on the streets of Tehran.

In cultures all across the world, women dress in flattering, attractive clothing, and adorn their faces and hair and bodies with make-up and ribbons and jewelry.  It's one of the most basic features, and joys, of human life.  But not under Sharia.  Under Sharia, women must dress in drab sacks of cloth that eliminate their individuality, hide their beauty, and suppress their spirit.  The Sharia manner of dress appears alien and hostile to us precisely because it is contrary to human nature, and the outward mark of a deep and sinister oppression.  Even the most committed "multiculturalist" knows in his gut (even if he won't admit out loud) that there is something profoundly wrong with a society that requires women to wear the hijab or chador or burqa. 

The supposed purpose of the strict Islamic dress code is to protect the "modesty" of both women and men.  As the public prosecutor of Tehran explained:  "These women who appear in public like decadent models [huh?] endanger the security and dignity of young men."  But apparently covering women from head to foot in multiple layers of fabric is not enough to ensure that men behave piously. 

Case in point:  Iran's sabre-rattling president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who was elected in 2005 on a conservative Islamic platform.  Fox News reports  that Ahmadinejad himself has come under fire from Islamic fundamentalists for violating the strictures of Sharia.  At a recent event honoring teachers, Ahmadinejad bowed and kissed an elderly woman's gloved hand and gave her a hug.  Although the woman wore a long black coat, a headscarf, and thick black gloves, Ahmadinejad's actions "prompted charges of indecency by the influential and hard-line Islamic newspaper Hezbollah."

Denying the Holocaust?  That's not indecent.  Supporting terrorism?  That's not indecent.  Pursuing nuclear weapons and threatening to destroy the State of Israel?  That's not indecent, either.  But kissing an old lady's gloved hand?  Now that's indecent! 

What a cold, twisted creed it is that criticizes a man for kissing the gloved hand of an elderly woman, yet applauds when that very same man threatens to destroy another nation.  While this episode may seem trivial, it perfectly illustrates the militant Islamist preference for death over life.  Simple acts of human tenderness are forbidden under Sharia, while killing Jews and Christians and other infidels is commanded by Allah.  So long as Muslims hold to such beliefs, I can't honestly believe that Islam and the West are compatible and can co-exist in peace.

Steven M. Warshawsky