Passover tips from Japan (updated)

Thomas Lifson
There are a number of varieties of Japanese commercial television programming that seem almost unthinkable on an American screen. One of them is represented by this video showing how Matzoth crackers, the traditional unleavened bread of the Passover holiday, van be divided and eaten. The narrative is as childish and idiotic as it sounds. It is supposed to be.

This sort of mini-feature is used to demonstrate unusual articles or practices from abroad. I suspect this one came from a children's show. Note the exquisite care taken in the approved method for splitting the Matzo.

The Japanese love to collect oddities from around the world, and tend to have a great deal more patience than American audiences for detail and for comic shtick about such topics.


If I can find something comparable from Japan on Easter eggs, or better yet, spiral-cut Easter ham, I will post it as rapidly as possible to make the holiday ecumenical.


Hat tip: Max G.

Update: Ethel C. Fenig recommends this Passover video, a clever song parody.
There are a number of varieties of Japanese commercial television programming that seem almost unthinkable on an American screen. One of them is represented by this video showing how Matzoth crackers, the traditional unleavened bread of the Passover holiday, van be divided and eaten. The narrative is as childish and idiotic as it sounds. It is supposed to be.

This sort of mini-feature is used to demonstrate unusual articles or practices from abroad. I suspect this one came from a children's show. Note the exquisite care taken in the approved method for splitting the Matzo.

The Japanese love to collect oddities from around the world, and tend to have a great deal more patience than American audiences for detail and for comic shtick about such topics.


If I can find something comparable from Japan on Easter eggs, or better yet, spiral-cut Easter ham, I will post it as rapidly as possible to make the holiday ecumenical.


Hat tip: Max G.

Update: Ethel C. Fenig recommends this Passover video, a clever song parody.