Iran bribing Iraqi politicians

While Democrats are touting their plans to cut funds to Iraq, Iran is reported to be offering bribes to Iraqi parliamentarians.  Evidently the Iranians realize we haven't quite yet lost, as Harry Reid contends. Eli Lake of the New York Sun reports:
BAGHDAD - Politicians here are being offered substantial sums of money by the Iranian government, according to an Iraqi lawmaker who says the next front in the war for Iraqi freedom will be to ward off unwanted influence from the mullahs in Tehran.

Like most of the members of the Iraqi parliament, both Sunni and Shiite, Mithal al-Alusi has been offered cash by the Iranian ambassador to Iraq, Hassan Kazemi Qomi. But unlike most of his colleagues in the parliament, Mr. al-Alusi has made the bribe public by telling the story to this journalist.

Sitting in his living room underneath a photo of his two sons who were slain by terrorists in 2005, Mr. al-Alusi says at first the offer of influence was conveyed by a local sheik he knew but declined to name. "They offered me anything I want," he said.
While Democrats are touting their plans to cut funds to Iraq, Iran is reported to be offering bribes to Iraqi parliamentarians.  Evidently the Iranians realize we haven't quite yet lost, as Harry Reid contends. Eli Lake of the New York Sun reports:
BAGHDAD - Politicians here are being offered substantial sums of money by the Iranian government, according to an Iraqi lawmaker who says the next front in the war for Iraqi freedom will be to ward off unwanted influence from the mullahs in Tehran.

Like most of the members of the Iraqi parliament, both Sunni and Shiite, Mithal al-Alusi has been offered cash by the Iranian ambassador to Iraq, Hassan Kazemi Qomi. But unlike most of his colleagues in the parliament, Mr. al-Alusi has made the bribe public by telling the story to this journalist.

Sitting in his living room underneath a photo of his two sons who were slain by terrorists in 2005, Mr. al-Alusi says at first the offer of influence was conveyed by a local sheik he knew but declined to name. "They offered me anything I want," he said.