CIA finally clamps down on Plame's cohorts

Too late to preclude the damage done to the Agency and others by the indiscriminate blabbing by Plame's old buddies, the CIA finally is getting serious about controlling the public statements of ex-agents.
The CIA's Publications Review Board is sending out terse reminders to agency veterans reminding them of the rules requiring that any writings--even blogs--must first get agency approval, US News and World Report reports Wednesday. Excerpts:

Among those getting the warning is outspoken blogger and ex-agency man Larry Johnson, who smells censorship.

"It's very selective," says Johnson, who has been critical of the CIA's failure to defend outed ex-spook Valerie Plame. His note from CIA brass referenced his blogging.

A CIA spokesman described the reminder as standard operating procedure.

"Should anyone be surprised if CIA reminds people of the obligations they voluntarily assumed?" asks the agency in a statement. Exempted from the review list: radio and TV appearances--unless written notes are used.
Three short years ago people even still on the agency payroll were traveling around the country campaigning for his opponent, writing books critical of the Administration and otherwise engaging in outrageously partisan activity, including apparently leaking damaging secrets to the press.

Where was George Tenet when all that was going on?

Hat tip: ts
Too late to preclude the damage done to the Agency and others by the indiscriminate blabbing by Plame's old buddies, the CIA finally is getting serious about controlling the public statements of ex-agents.
The CIA's Publications Review Board is sending out terse reminders to agency veterans reminding them of the rules requiring that any writings--even blogs--must first get agency approval, US News and World Report reports Wednesday. Excerpts:

Among those getting the warning is outspoken blogger and ex-agency man Larry Johnson, who smells censorship.

"It's very selective," says Johnson, who has been critical of the CIA's failure to defend outed ex-spook Valerie Plame. His note from CIA brass referenced his blogging.

A CIA spokesman described the reminder as standard operating procedure.

"Should anyone be surprised if CIA reminds people of the obligations they voluntarily assumed?" asks the agency in a statement. Exempted from the review list: radio and TV appearances--unless written notes are used.
Three short years ago people even still on the agency payroll were traveling around the country campaigning for his opponent, writing books critical of the Administration and otherwise engaging in outrageously partisan activity, including apparently leaking damaging secrets to the press.

Where was George Tenet when all that was going on?

Hat tip: ts