China's espionage

While America is preoccupied with the war on terror, concentrating intelligence and counter-intelligence  resources on Islamic targets, China remains actively engaged in stealing defense secrets, particularly technology. That's the picture painted  today by Nick Bliss of Bloomberg.

For every person caught and accused of passing U.S. military and trade secrets to China, [U.S. intelligence officials] say, scores of others go undetected. Taking advantage of an outmanned counterintelligence effort drained and distracted by the wars in Iraq and against al-Qaeda, current and former officials say, China has systematically managed to gain sensitive information on U.S. nuclear bombs and ship and missile designs.

``Iraq and the struggle with terrorism are sucking resources across the board,'' says Joel Brenner, the top counterintelligence official in the office of Director of National Intelligence Michael McConnell. Meanwhile, ``the Chinese are really making a run at us.''

Adds Keith Riggin, a former senior official at the Central Intelligence Agency who focused on China issues: ``If the American people knew the number of officers going against the Chinese, they would be appalled.'' He says his frustration with the lack of resources was one reason he ended a 24-year career in 2006.

Although one has to routinely discount appeals from government sources for more resources, it does seem likely that the reported retirement of experienced agents with a focus on China is a serious issue. It also seems quite plausible that China has been accelerating her efforts. The very large number of Chinese emigrants provides a ready pool for recruitment. No matter how loyal to America the majority of Chinese immigrants to these shores, it cannot be denied that there will always be a minority subject to pressures or lured by a mix of rewards and appeals. The fact that so many are highly educated and skilled in many areas of technology makes the problem all the worse. It is politically incorrect to note this, but it seems undeniable. The cases cited by

China is open about its ambition to rival and surpass the United States militarily. The cases cited by Bliss all involve people with apparently Chinese surnames, although the article makes no mention of this connection.


Hat tip: Bryan Demko
While America is preoccupied with the war on terror, concentrating intelligence and counter-intelligence  resources on Islamic targets, China remains actively engaged in stealing defense secrets, particularly technology. That's the picture painted  today by Nick Bliss of Bloomberg.

For every person caught and accused of passing U.S. military and trade secrets to China, [U.S. intelligence officials] say, scores of others go undetected. Taking advantage of an outmanned counterintelligence effort drained and distracted by the wars in Iraq and against al-Qaeda, current and former officials say, China has systematically managed to gain sensitive information on U.S. nuclear bombs and ship and missile designs.

``Iraq and the struggle with terrorism are sucking resources across the board,'' says Joel Brenner, the top counterintelligence official in the office of Director of National Intelligence Michael McConnell. Meanwhile, ``the Chinese are really making a run at us.''

Adds Keith Riggin, a former senior official at the Central Intelligence Agency who focused on China issues: ``If the American people knew the number of officers going against the Chinese, they would be appalled.'' He says his frustration with the lack of resources was one reason he ended a 24-year career in 2006.

Although one has to routinely discount appeals from government sources for more resources, it does seem likely that the reported retirement of experienced agents with a focus on China is a serious issue. It also seems quite plausible that China has been accelerating her efforts. The very large number of Chinese emigrants provides a ready pool for recruitment. No matter how loyal to America the majority of Chinese immigrants to these shores, it cannot be denied that there will always be a minority subject to pressures or lured by a mix of rewards and appeals. The fact that so many are highly educated and skilled in many areas of technology makes the problem all the worse. It is politically incorrect to note this, but it seems undeniable. The cases cited by

China is open about its ambition to rival and surpass the United States militarily. The cases cited by Bliss all involve people with apparently Chinese surnames, although the article makes no mention of this connection.


Hat tip: Bryan Demko