Always look on the bright side of life

Ed Lasky
Reading this New York Times review of a new play about the Holocaust, I am faced with the question: what moral universe does the NYT live in? David NG writes:
It seems rude, even sacrilegious, to fault a Holocaust drama for failing to entertain. Most of us don't associate genocide with a fun night at the theater after all. But neither should we be expected to endure a mind-numbing history lesson. "The Accomplices," which opened last night at the Acorn Theater, is a soporific lecture of a play. If humorlessness were the measure of good art, it could rank among the best productions of the year. [emphasis added]
Who could fail to see the humor?
Reading this New York Times review of a new play about the Holocaust, I am faced with the question: what moral universe does the NYT live in? David NG writes:
It seems rude, even sacrilegious, to fault a Holocaust drama for failing to entertain. Most of us don't associate genocide with a fun night at the theater after all. But neither should we be expected to endure a mind-numbing history lesson. "The Accomplices," which opened last night at the Acorn Theater, is a soporific lecture of a play. If humorlessness were the measure of good art, it could rank among the best productions of the year. [emphasis added]
Who could fail to see the humor?