The scandal machine

Ed Lasky
Gabriel Schoenfeld’s post on the Libby verdict below makes a good occasion to offer our readers veteran Commentary contributor Paul Johnson’s review of Suzanne Garment’s 1992 book Scandal—a penetrating tome on issues not identical with but germane to those brought up by the Libby trial. Johnson’s review finds indisputable Garment’s contention that

Democratic Congresses, by devising special acts and procedures for the prosecution of public officials, in conjunction with “investigative journalists” of the media, overwhelmingly Democratic or even radical, have between them developed a culture of mistrust toward those in power which has made good government—that is to say, courageous government, willing to take calculated risks and make unpopular decisions—far more difficult.

Gabriel Schoenfeld’s post on the Libby verdict below makes a good occasion to offer our readers veteran Commentary contributor Paul Johnson’s review of Suzanne Garment’s 1992 book Scandal—a penetrating tome on issues not identical with but germane to those brought up by the Libby trial. Johnson’s review finds indisputable Garment’s contention that

Democratic Congresses, by devising special acts and procedures for the prosecution of public officials, in conjunction with “investigative journalists” of the media, overwhelmingly Democratic or even radical, have between them developed a culture of mistrust toward those in power which has made good government—that is to say, courageous government, willing to take calculated risks and make unpopular decisions—far more difficult.