Saudi-Iranian summit apparently fails

Thomas Lifson
It appears that the talks between King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia and Iran's President Ahmedinejad blew up. Dr. Guy Bechor, head of Middle Eastern Studies at the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) in Herzliya writes in the Jerusalem Post that the Saudis went out of their way to signal the importance of the talks and set an atmosphere conducive to cutting a deal. But:
Shortly before midnight, it was announced suddenly that Ahmadinejad was returning to Teheran. I believe that the talks blew up, since it's strange for him not to have stayed at least a night on such an important visit, one that had been prepared ahead of time.

The fact remains that Ahmadinejad and the Saudis did not voice any intention of continuing talks after the visit. Also, no official message on the meeting was published, as is the norm. Ahmadinejad has a hot temper, and he tends to get offended. Maybe he thought that the Saudis were interfering in something that was none of their business.
If this intelligence and its interpretation is valid, it could well make an attack on Iran's nuclear facilities come sooner.

Hat tip: Ronny Gordon
It appears that the talks between King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia and Iran's President Ahmedinejad blew up. Dr. Guy Bechor, head of Middle Eastern Studies at the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) in Herzliya writes in the Jerusalem Post that the Saudis went out of their way to signal the importance of the talks and set an atmosphere conducive to cutting a deal. But:
Shortly before midnight, it was announced suddenly that Ahmadinejad was returning to Teheran. I believe that the talks blew up, since it's strange for him not to have stayed at least a night on such an important visit, one that had been prepared ahead of time.

The fact remains that Ahmadinejad and the Saudis did not voice any intention of continuing talks after the visit. Also, no official message on the meeting was published, as is the norm. Ahmadinejad has a hot temper, and he tends to get offended. Maybe he thought that the Saudis were interfering in something that was none of their business.
If this intelligence and its interpretation is valid, it could well make an attack on Iran's nuclear facilities come sooner.

Hat tip: Ronny Gordon