A master wields the scalpel

Thomas Lifson
Jules Crittenden, who knows the news business, takes apart an AP dispatch from Iraq by Stephen R. Hurst, showing how it uses propaganda techniques to spin good news into bad. In my dreams (and nowhere else, I am sure), a vice president at AP would call in Hurst and his editor and ask what the hell is going on, after reading Crittenden.  

The AP's Stephen R. Hurst proclaims the resilience of Sunni insurgents!  
 BAGHDAD (AP) - Sunni insurgents, resilient despite the five-week security crackdown in the capital, killed at least six more American troops over the weekend. A Sunni car bomber hit a largely Shiite district in the capital Sunday, killing at least eight people.
I'm getting a warm and fuzzy Pravda kind of feel off that, the "resilience."  Stalwart insurgents resiliently marching forward! You have to troll the North Korean web to find that kind of thing these days!

The next three paragraphs are devoted to American death, spiced up with phrases like the one about Anbar being "controlled by the Sunni insurgency." I'm concerned that might be somewhat overbroad, when you consider the significant influence of both the U.S. and Iraqi military and pro-government tribes have over what goes on in Anbar. But that's what good propaganda is all about! Then we get to this:
While U.S. and Iraqi troops have flooded the Baghdad streets and a heavily armored American column was sent north to adjacent Diyala province, attacks on American and Iraqi forces have been robust.
The resilient enemy is also robust! Strangely, no mention of the "dozens" of resilient, robuts insurgents who were granted martyrdom in that action. But let's not dawdle about the trivial details. We'll get to those, such as the "violence down" later. We're following AP's schedule, and AP is playing gotcha!  Any action or reaction by terrorists who have been severely set back is a sign of surge failure, and must be played high, resiliently and robustly.  All American statements must be buried, carefully selected and couched to suggest futility.
Jules Crittenden, who knows the news business, takes apart an AP dispatch from Iraq by Stephen R. Hurst, showing how it uses propaganda techniques to spin good news into bad. In my dreams (and nowhere else, I am sure), a vice president at AP would call in Hurst and his editor and ask what the hell is going on, after reading Crittenden.  

The AP's Stephen R. Hurst proclaims the resilience of Sunni insurgents!  
 BAGHDAD (AP) - Sunni insurgents, resilient despite the five-week security crackdown in the capital, killed at least six more American troops over the weekend. A Sunni car bomber hit a largely Shiite district in the capital Sunday, killing at least eight people.
I'm getting a warm and fuzzy Pravda kind of feel off that, the "resilience."  Stalwart insurgents resiliently marching forward! You have to troll the North Korean web to find that kind of thing these days!

The next three paragraphs are devoted to American death, spiced up with phrases like the one about Anbar being "controlled by the Sunni insurgency." I'm concerned that might be somewhat overbroad, when you consider the significant influence of both the U.S. and Iraqi military and pro-government tribes have over what goes on in Anbar. But that's what good propaganda is all about! Then we get to this:
While U.S. and Iraqi troops have flooded the Baghdad streets and a heavily armored American column was sent north to adjacent Diyala province, attacks on American and Iraqi forces have been robust.
The resilient enemy is also robust! Strangely, no mention of the "dozens" of resilient, robuts insurgents who were granted martyrdom in that action. But let's not dawdle about the trivial details. We'll get to those, such as the "violence down" later. We're following AP's schedule, and AP is playing gotcha!  Any action or reaction by terrorists who have been severely set back is a sign of surge failure, and must be played high, resiliently and robustly.  All American statements must be buried, carefully selected and couched to suggest futility.