Border crossing chic

The New York Times carries a troubling piece today that almost glamorizes illegal border crossing. "Run! Hide! The Illegal Border Crossing Experience," reads the headline. The reporter carefully stayed within the bolunds of the law, and joined a tourist group that is savoring for pleasure the experiences illegal border crossers have.
The night was crisp and clear in the central Mexican highlands, the moon illuminating mesquite trees, cactus and pastures. Our group of 13 was about to set out on one of Mexico's more bizarre tourist attractions: a make-believe trip illegally crossing the Rio Grande from Mexico into the United States.
Apparently we are not to worry about faux-flouting the law, though. The government approves (The Mexican government, that is).
Organizers say they opened the park about two and a half years ago, with financing from the Mexican government, and began the caminata as a way to offer tourists a taste of life as an illegal immigrant.
The funny thing is that liberals are extremely fond of the expression "the rule of law" every time a judge imposes liberalism on the voters. But when the law in question doesn';t meet their approval, flouting it becomes an "experience" to be savored.

I wonder what the NYT's reaction would be to a fantasy park which offered a faux flouting of laws they approve of? "The hate crime experience"? "The contempt of court experience"?

Hat tip: Joseph Crowley
The New York Times carries a troubling piece today that almost glamorizes illegal border crossing. "Run! Hide! The Illegal Border Crossing Experience," reads the headline. The reporter carefully stayed within the bolunds of the law, and joined a tourist group that is savoring for pleasure the experiences illegal border crossers have.
The night was crisp and clear in the central Mexican highlands, the moon illuminating mesquite trees, cactus and pastures. Our group of 13 was about to set out on one of Mexico's more bizarre tourist attractions: a make-believe trip illegally crossing the Rio Grande from Mexico into the United States.
Apparently we are not to worry about faux-flouting the law, though. The government approves (The Mexican government, that is).
Organizers say they opened the park about two and a half years ago, with financing from the Mexican government, and began the caminata as a way to offer tourists a taste of life as an illegal immigrant.
The funny thing is that liberals are extremely fond of the expression "the rule of law" every time a judge imposes liberalism on the voters. But when the law in question doesn';t meet their approval, flouting it becomes an "experience" to be savored.

I wonder what the NYT's reaction would be to a fantasy park which offered a faux flouting of laws they approve of? "The hate crime experience"? "The contempt of court experience"?

Hat tip: Joseph Crowley