Seinfeld disappoints

Confession: I miss the Seinfeld show; I watch the reruns as consolation. Grossly politically incorrect with selfish, self centered main characters who are totally clueless of life beyond their narrow boundaries, not to mention within them, the show was one of the few that consistently made me laugh out loud. Taking the usual nothings of life such as relationships, jobs, family, finding a car in a parking lot, discussing small thoughts in a restaurant or buying soup at a take out among the overly educated young, the episodes, as in real life, did not end all warm and gooey, with the main protagonists having learned important lessons.  No, they remained as ignorant at the end as the beginning,  stumbling along to their next mishap.
But in an incident of life imitating a Seinfeld episode, Jerry Seinfeld refused to pay a real estate agent her commission because she
was unavailable when Seinfeld tried to reach her on a Saturday in February, 2005, according to the New York Post.
And why wasn't she available at his beck and call?
Cohen did not answer her cell phone due to it being the Sabbath....
Having previously seen the pricey property in the company of the broker, the Seinfelds then negotiated directly with the owner, thus believing they didn't owe the commission.  A judge ruled otherwise.

While this might have made a great half hour of television aw gee, Jerry, Jerry, Jerry certainly you're not so clueless in real life. Did you need Elaine or Kramer or George to explain the lifestyle of Jewish Sabbath observers?  You and your wife grew up in the NY area, you live on NY's Upper West Side which has many Sabbath observing Jews , both of you are Jewish so you must have learned a few things even if you don't observe them yourselves. Yeah, there is something wrong with stiffing an agent because yada, yada, yada. 
Confession: I miss the Seinfeld show; I watch the reruns as consolation. Grossly politically incorrect with selfish, self centered main characters who are totally clueless of life beyond their narrow boundaries, not to mention within them, the show was one of the few that consistently made me laugh out loud. Taking the usual nothings of life such as relationships, jobs, family, finding a car in a parking lot, discussing small thoughts in a restaurant or buying soup at a take out among the overly educated young, the episodes, as in real life, did not end all warm and gooey, with the main protagonists having learned important lessons.  No, they remained as ignorant at the end as the beginning,  stumbling along to their next mishap.
But in an incident of life imitating a Seinfeld episode, Jerry Seinfeld refused to pay a real estate agent her commission because she
was unavailable when Seinfeld tried to reach her on a Saturday in February, 2005, according to the New York Post.
And why wasn't she available at his beck and call?
Cohen did not answer her cell phone due to it being the Sabbath....
Having previously seen the pricey property in the company of the broker, the Seinfelds then negotiated directly with the owner, thus believing they didn't owe the commission.  A judge ruled otherwise.

While this might have made a great half hour of television aw gee, Jerry, Jerry, Jerry certainly you're not so clueless in real life. Did you need Elaine or Kramer or George to explain the lifestyle of Jewish Sabbath observers?  You and your wife grew up in the NY area, you live on NY's Upper West Side which has many Sabbath observing Jews , both of you are Jewish so you must have learned a few things even if you don't observe them yourselves. Yeah, there is something wrong with stiffing an agent because yada, yada, yada.