North Korea folding on nukes?

First Libya, now North Korea folds on their nuclear program - if this news from the South Korean national daily Chosun Ilbo is to be believed. And  jerks like Carter, Arafat and Annan got the Nobel prize for peace which rightly should go to President Bush (and certainly will not). Chosun Ilbo reports:
North Korea has reportedly agreed to halt nuclear activities including operations at a reactor in Yongbyon, and allow on-site monitoring by the International Atomic Energy Agency as the first steps to abandoning its nuclear program. The agreement came during a meeting of the chief nuclear negotiators of the U.S. and North Korea that ended Friday in Berlin, sources said.

According to diplomatic sources in Seoul and Beijing, North Korea's top nuclear envoy Kim Kye-gwan told his U.S. counterpart Christopher Hill that North Korea will yield in return for economic and energy aid from the U.S. and assurances that the U.S. will seek to unfreeze North Korea'ss US$24 million in accounts with the Macau-based Banco Delta Asia.

The U.S. will discuss conditions for the lifting of financial sanctions in separate bilateral talks scheduled this month. The North is expected to implement its part of the deal once it is finalized in the next round of the six-nation nuclear talks, which are likely to resume early next month. Pyongyang and Washington agreed to use the term "monitoring" rather than "inspection."
Hat tip: Hal 9000
First Libya, now North Korea folds on their nuclear program - if this news from the South Korean national daily Chosun Ilbo is to be believed. And  jerks like Carter, Arafat and Annan got the Nobel prize for peace which rightly should go to President Bush (and certainly will not). Chosun Ilbo reports:
North Korea has reportedly agreed to halt nuclear activities including operations at a reactor in Yongbyon, and allow on-site monitoring by the International Atomic Energy Agency as the first steps to abandoning its nuclear program. The agreement came during a meeting of the chief nuclear negotiators of the U.S. and North Korea that ended Friday in Berlin, sources said.

According to diplomatic sources in Seoul and Beijing, North Korea's top nuclear envoy Kim Kye-gwan told his U.S. counterpart Christopher Hill that North Korea will yield in return for economic and energy aid from the U.S. and assurances that the U.S. will seek to unfreeze North Korea'ss US$24 million in accounts with the Macau-based Banco Delta Asia.

The U.S. will discuss conditions for the lifting of financial sanctions in separate bilateral talks scheduled this month. The North is expected to implement its part of the deal once it is finalized in the next round of the six-nation nuclear talks, which are likely to resume early next month. Pyongyang and Washington agreed to use the term "monitoring" rather than "inspection."
Hat tip: Hal 9000