"Mr. Kristof made things up"

Clarice Feldman
Nicholas Kristof is the columnist for the New York Times whom some may recall was the first reporter to megaphone Joseph A Wilson's serial lies against the administration. Mr. Kristof  is also a defendant in the defamation suit brought against the New York Times by  former Army scientist Steven Hatfill.

In the course of that litigation, discovery revealed that an editor warned Kristof to remove some of the report as it was incriminiating, but Kristof ignored that warning. Exactly how does a columnist override an editor? Could someone named Pinch be involved?

More significantly, it appears that 
Kristof simply made stuff up, according to an AP report:
Grannis said that in addition to the editor's warning, several of Kristof's sources testified in pretrial depositions that they did not provide the information Kristof has said they did.

"Mr. Kristof made things up," Grannis said. "What Mr. Kristof reported was not just false, it was embarrassingly false. It was outrageously false."
If this is what happens with named sources, imagine what reporters do with anonymous ones.
Nicholas Kristof is the columnist for the New York Times whom some may recall was the first reporter to megaphone Joseph A Wilson's serial lies against the administration. Mr. Kristof  is also a defendant in the defamation suit brought against the New York Times by  former Army scientist Steven Hatfill.

In the course of that litigation, discovery revealed that an editor warned Kristof to remove some of the report as it was incriminiating, but Kristof ignored that warning. Exactly how does a columnist override an editor? Could someone named Pinch be involved?

More significantly, it appears that 
Kristof simply made stuff up, according to an AP report:
Grannis said that in addition to the editor's warning, several of Kristof's sources testified in pretrial depositions that they did not provide the information Kristof has said they did.

"Mr. Kristof made things up," Grannis said. "What Mr. Kristof reported was not just false, it was embarrassingly false. It was outrageously false."
If this is what happens with named sources, imagine what reporters do with anonymous ones.