Dhimmitude in the UK

In the UK, efforts to mollify Muslims continue to lead to absurd positions by pubic authorities. The Union Jack has been banned from at least one prison lest the sight of its Cross of St. George offend the inmates. Piggy banks were banned from one public office. And now a British school girl has been barred from wearing a crucifix, even as Muslims and Sikhs are free to wear religious symbols.

Agence France Presse reports
A BRITISH schoolgirl has been barred from wearing a crucifix necklace in class, the Daily Mail reported today.

Samantha Devine, a 13-year-old Roman Catholic, was told by teachers in Gillingham, south-east England, that it breached health and safety rules, the paper added.

Her family reportedly says it will fight the decision and has accused the school of discriminating against Christians because Sikh and Muslim pupils can wear religious symbols.

The case echoes that of British Airways employee Nadia Eweida, who was suspended in October for failing to remove her necklace or hide it under clothing in accordance with company policy.
Dhimmitude marches on as authorities offer their submission.

Hat tip: N.S. Rajaram
In the UK, efforts to mollify Muslims continue to lead to absurd positions by pubic authorities. The Union Jack has been banned from at least one prison lest the sight of its Cross of St. George offend the inmates. Piggy banks were banned from one public office. And now a British school girl has been barred from wearing a crucifix, even as Muslims and Sikhs are free to wear religious symbols.

Agence France Presse reports
A BRITISH schoolgirl has been barred from wearing a crucifix necklace in class, the Daily Mail reported today.

Samantha Devine, a 13-year-old Roman Catholic, was told by teachers in Gillingham, south-east England, that it breached health and safety rules, the paper added.

Her family reportedly says it will fight the decision and has accused the school of discriminating against Christians because Sikh and Muslim pupils can wear religious symbols.

The case echoes that of British Airways employee Nadia Eweida, who was suspended in October for failing to remove her necklace or hide it under clothing in accordance with company policy.
Dhimmitude marches on as authorities offer their submission.

Hat tip: N.S. Rajaram