When does the Abraham Linker brigade leave for Darfur?

Daryl Montgomery and Jack Kemp
The left's desire to say and do something about Darfur has been manifested on the streets of New York, with ads in my local subway station (and presumably others), as well as one Upper West Side of Manhattan house of worship placing a sign on its exterior wall. 
 
The concept I am about to propose and discuss was first mentioned by Jay Diamond on conservative New York talk radio in the 1990s. I propose to leftists that they mimic the gumption that their leftist forebears had in the 1930s when idealistic young leftists formed the Abraham Lincoln Brigade and went to Spain to fight against Franco's fascist army. That they were fighting with a Republican Army allied with the Soviet Union added spice to battle. [Language note: "Linker" in the title above is the Yiddish word for "Leftist."] After all, where would Russia be today if Comrade Stalin hadn't raised a vast Red Army to fight the Nazi invaders?
 
In those days, some in the American left had the courage of their convictions, even against strong Spanish enemies aided with Nazi Stuka dive bombers. Hollywood even made a feature film about the subject in 1943, "For Whom the Bell Tolls," starring Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman in an adaptation of the 1940 Hemingway novel. This adaptation, however, played down the political angle of Cooper's character to make the story more acceptable to the American public. All the same, Hollywood applauded this character based loosely on Ernest Hemingway himself.
 
The left is always attacking President Bush for not serving in Viet Nam, like Bill Clinton...er...never mind. Well, they consider Pres. Bush hypocritical and unqualified because of this. But where are the leftist volunteers for Darfur? Michael Moore could use some of his millions to finance a training camp for military volunteers for Darfur.
 
At least when they put up the posters for both the book and movie versions of "For Whom the Bell Tolls" in the 1940s, there was a real person's story behind the images with the courage of their convictions to fight the fascists. Today, we just get the pos
ters and signs from the left. But the artwork reproduction is better because it is digitalized.
The left's desire to say and do something about Darfur has been manifested on the streets of New York, with ads in my local subway station (and presumably others), as well as one Upper West Side of Manhattan house of worship placing a sign on its exterior wall. 
 
The concept I am about to propose and discuss was first mentioned by Jay Diamond on conservative New York talk radio in the 1990s. I propose to leftists that they mimic the gumption that their leftist forebears had in the 1930s when idealistic young leftists formed the Abraham Lincoln Brigade and went to Spain to fight against Franco's fascist army. That they were fighting with a Republican Army allied with the Soviet Union added spice to battle. [Language note: "Linker" in the title above is the Yiddish word for "Leftist."] After all, where would Russia be today if Comrade Stalin hadn't raised a vast Red Army to fight the Nazi invaders?
 
In those days, some in the American left had the courage of their convictions, even against strong Spanish enemies aided with Nazi Stuka dive bombers. Hollywood even made a feature film about the subject in 1943, "For Whom the Bell Tolls," starring Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman in an adaptation of the 1940 Hemingway novel. This adaptation, however, played down the political angle of Cooper's character to make the story more acceptable to the American public. All the same, Hollywood applauded this character based loosely on Ernest Hemingway himself.
 
The left is always attacking President Bush for not serving in Viet Nam, like Bill Clinton...er...never mind. Well, they consider Pres. Bush hypocritical and unqualified because of this. But where are the leftist volunteers for Darfur? Michael Moore could use some of his millions to finance a training camp for military volunteers for Darfur.
 
At least when they put up the posters for both the book and movie versions of "For Whom the Bell Tolls" in the 1940s, there was a real person's story behind the images with the courage of their convictions to fight the fascists. Today, we just get the pos
ters and signs from the left. But the artwork reproduction is better because it is digitalized.