Vegas unions new Dem primary season powerhouse

The Democrats are adjusting their schedule of primaries and caucuses in the season leading up to the 2008 presidential nominations. The Los Angeles Times reports,

The Democratic National Committee, looking for more diverse voices in choosing the party's next presidential nominee, recently bumped Nevada to the front of its 2008 election calendar; its caucus is scheduled for Jan. 19, between the first contest, in Iowa, and New Hampshire's fabled primary later that month.

To political oddsmakers, there are a number of potential beneficiaries, including the state Democratic Party; Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, a Nevada Democrat who lobbied for the change; and New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, a potential presidential candidate who has a presence in the region and could use a strong showing in Nevada as a springboard for his campaign.

But analysts say the most evident beneficiary is Local 226, whose humble, bustling headquarters is in a stretch of Las Vegas known as Naked City, which is otherwise home to cheap hotels full of strippers and down—and—outers, tattoo parlors and funky art galleries.

It is no secret that Democrats have long resented Iowa and New Hampshire having a leading role in the nomination process because those states are "too white." After all, when you have too many white people that is self—evidently a bad thing as far as Democrats are concerned.

The only private sector unions that are growing are in the service tardes, especially low wage jobs like hotel workers. Nevada is a very rare state in that unions are a rising force. At 13.8% of its work force, unions are ahead of their national average of 12.5%.

The huge hotels in Las Vegas are comparatively easy to organize. You have large numbers of workers surrounded by conspicuous consumption, but earning comparatively little. The housing bubble in Las Vegas has hit low wage workers quite hard, raising the cost of decent housing beyond the means of many. I can well understand why workers there might wish to organize and demand better wages. But of course, if Las Vegas becomes uncompetitive with Atlantic City, Indian casinos, Macao and Dubai, it can follow Detroit toward rising unemployment. Vacationers get to choose their destinations.

Ironically, the Democrats' move will increase the role of organized labor in the presidential nomination process even as the overall role of unions in American life continues to decline outside of Nevada and a few other exceptions. This will once again tell Americans that the Democrats are the party of special interests.

Thomas Lifson   11 7 06

The Democrats are adjusting their schedule of primaries and caucuses in the season leading up to the 2008 presidential nominations. The Los Angeles Times reports,

The Democratic National Committee, looking for more diverse voices in choosing the party's next presidential nominee, recently bumped Nevada to the front of its 2008 election calendar; its caucus is scheduled for Jan. 19, between the first contest, in Iowa, and New Hampshire's fabled primary later that month.

To political oddsmakers, there are a number of potential beneficiaries, including the state Democratic Party; Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, a Nevada Democrat who lobbied for the change; and New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, a potential presidential candidate who has a presence in the region and could use a strong showing in Nevada as a springboard for his campaign.

But analysts say the most evident beneficiary is Local 226, whose humble, bustling headquarters is in a stretch of Las Vegas known as Naked City, which is otherwise home to cheap hotels full of strippers and down—and—outers, tattoo parlors and funky art galleries.

It is no secret that Democrats have long resented Iowa and New Hampshire having a leading role in the nomination process because those states are "too white." After all, when you have too many white people that is self—evidently a bad thing as far as Democrats are concerned.

The only private sector unions that are growing are in the service tardes, especially low wage jobs like hotel workers. Nevada is a very rare state in that unions are a rising force. At 13.8% of its work force, unions are ahead of their national average of 12.5%.

The huge hotels in Las Vegas are comparatively easy to organize. You have large numbers of workers surrounded by conspicuous consumption, but earning comparatively little. The housing bubble in Las Vegas has hit low wage workers quite hard, raising the cost of decent housing beyond the means of many. I can well understand why workers there might wish to organize and demand better wages. But of course, if Las Vegas becomes uncompetitive with Atlantic City, Indian casinos, Macao and Dubai, it can follow Detroit toward rising unemployment. Vacationers get to choose their destinations.

Ironically, the Democrats' move will increase the role of organized labor in the presidential nomination process even as the overall role of unions in American life continues to decline outside of Nevada and a few other exceptions. This will once again tell Americans that the Democrats are the party of special interests.

Thomas Lifson   11 7 06