Separation of powers and war

letter to the editor
I would describe myself as a socially and fiscally conservative Republican. 

And I do agree with Mr. Redding that the Left has attempted, and often-times succeeded, with the help of the MainStream Media, in undermining the Bush Presidency in the eyes of some of the electorate.  However, I felt obligated to comment on a statement written by John Redding in his article "Our Divided American House" of November 26.

In his article, Mr. Redding states
"If in the next Congress Democrats strip the President of his war making power by defunding the war, will Republicans retaliate by filibustering any and all pieces of legislation?" 
The bit I take issue with is the "strip[ping] the President of his war making power." 

The comment seems to suggest that the Congress is duty-bound to uphold any military action begun by a President.

This is a dangerous assertion.  I don't usually respond to articles I read; a person's opinion is a person's opinion.  However, it should be stated that the separation of powers enshrined in the Constitution by our Founding Fathers expressly grants to Congress the "power of the purse" and set the Legislative and the Executive in "separate but equal" branches of government precisely to prevent the President or Congress from becoming all-powerful. 

The separation of the executive function of making war between the Congress (funding war) and the President (engaging in war) is a unique facet of our governing construct that is important to the separation of powers doctrine.

I bring this up to ensure that people reading Mr. Redding's article understand that the Congress has every right to defund the war if a majority of Congress feels it is in the best interest of the country.  While I do not agree that we should withdraw from the current fight against global Islamofascism, I do agree that if Congress deems it appropriate, then they have the right to withhold funding from the Executive.  If they commit an error, then it is the power of the people to remove those responsible through the electoral process.

Thank you for your time and your website.  It is nice to see non-MSM out there speaking for the silent majority.

Randy Broussard
I would describe myself as a socially and fiscally conservative Republican. 

And I do agree with Mr. Redding that the Left has attempted, and often-times succeeded, with the help of the MainStream Media, in undermining the Bush Presidency in the eyes of some of the electorate.  However, I felt obligated to comment on a statement written by John Redding in his article "Our Divided American House" of November 26.

In his article, Mr. Redding states
"If in the next Congress Democrats strip the President of his war making power by defunding the war, will Republicans retaliate by filibustering any and all pieces of legislation?" 
The bit I take issue with is the "strip[ping] the President of his war making power." 

The comment seems to suggest that the Congress is duty-bound to uphold any military action begun by a President.

This is a dangerous assertion.  I don't usually respond to articles I read; a person's opinion is a person's opinion.  However, it should be stated that the separation of powers enshrined in the Constitution by our Founding Fathers expressly grants to Congress the "power of the purse" and set the Legislative and the Executive in "separate but equal" branches of government precisely to prevent the President or Congress from becoming all-powerful. 

The separation of the executive function of making war between the Congress (funding war) and the President (engaging in war) is a unique facet of our governing construct that is important to the separation of powers doctrine.

I bring this up to ensure that people reading Mr. Redding's article understand that the Congress has every right to defund the war if a majority of Congress feels it is in the best interest of the country.  While I do not agree that we should withdraw from the current fight against global Islamofascism, I do agree that if Congress deems it appropriate, then they have the right to withhold funding from the Executive.  If they commit an error, then it is the power of the people to remove those responsible through the electoral process.

Thank you for your time and your website.  It is nice to see non-MSM out there speaking for the silent majority.

Randy Broussard