Off to the races

By

Nancy Pelosi has thrown her support to cut and runner, slanderer of our troops, Abscam figure and pork barreler Murtha as Majority Leader. Waxman has announced he's going to investigate everything. (Including the war which, despite today's New York Times article, to the contrary, has been  the subject of multiple investigations.)

Leahy has announced he wants to rewrite the law to give terrorist suspects the right of habeas corpus and there are mewlings from the Democrats  about refusing to pass the preposterously described "warrantless wiretapping" program.

Off to a great start.

If Newsweek polls mean anything, perhaps the Dems ought to consider this:

While a bare majority of 51 percent called the Democrats' victory "a good thing," even more said they were concerned about some of the actions a Democratic Congress might take, including 78 percent who were somewhat or very concerned that it would seek too hasty a withdrawal of troops from Iraq.

Another 69 percent said they were concerned that the new Congress would keep the administration "from doing what is necessary to combat terrorism," and two—thirds said they were concerned it would spend too much time investigating the administration and Republican scandals."

One bright ray of sunshine, Lieberman refuses to promise not to switch parties.
 
Clarice Feldman   11 13 06

Nancy Pelosi has thrown her support to cut and runner, slanderer of our troops, Abscam figure and pork barreler Murtha as Majority Leader. Waxman has announced he's going to investigate everything. (Including the war which, despite today's New York Times article, to the contrary, has been  the subject of multiple investigations.)

Leahy has announced he wants to rewrite the law to give terrorist suspects the right of habeas corpus and there are mewlings from the Democrats  about refusing to pass the preposterously described "warrantless wiretapping" program.

Off to a great start.

If Newsweek polls mean anything, perhaps the Dems ought to consider this:

While a bare majority of 51 percent called the Democrats' victory "a good thing," even more said they were concerned about some of the actions a Democratic Congress might take, including 78 percent who were somewhat or very concerned that it would seek too hasty a withdrawal of troops from Iraq.

Another 69 percent said they were concerned that the new Congress would keep the administration "from doing what is necessary to combat terrorism," and two—thirds said they were concerned it would spend too much time investigating the administration and Republican scandals."

One bright ray of sunshine, Lieberman refuses to promise not to switch parties.
 
Clarice Feldman   11 13 06