Like a former high-performer

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The GOP leadership is like the upper management guy who's been around a long time.  He did great things in the past —— broke sales records, came up with great ideas for the company's growth, etc.  He rose to a high position and had the respect of everyone.  He thought he was in for life.

But, as he was resting on his laurels, he started to take long lunches, and go on long vacations, he began to delegate jobs that were really his to his subordinates,  then he took a few goodies here and there on the side, started flirting with the cute, new receptionist, accepted gifts from customers that he shouldn't have —— basically, the guy started slacking.  But he was "in."  He had no fear of losing his job.

Then one day, the boss calls him in to his office and says, "Look Charlie, I know what you've been doing and you've got 90 days to get your act together or you're out."

Fear, shock, and shame rise up in Charlie's heart.  How could this happen to him?  Reality hits him like a sledgehammer.  He goes home depressed, gets drunk, staggers around for a day or two trying to fit this new reality on like a new starched and uncomfortable suit.  He has a choice.  He's got it in him —— always has.

So, after feeling sorry for himself, and going through the whole grieving process of losing his "prince" status, he decides to re—evaluate, re—group and get back to basics.

One of my favorite quotes is from Winston Churchill.

"The secret of success is being able to go from one failure to the next without losing enthusiasm."

And if anyone knew that secret it was Churchill!

Beth Barnat   11 10 06

The GOP leadership is like the upper management guy who's been around a long time.  He did great things in the past —— broke sales records, came up with great ideas for the company's growth, etc.  He rose to a high position and had the respect of everyone.  He thought he was in for life.

But, as he was resting on his laurels, he started to take long lunches, and go on long vacations, he began to delegate jobs that were really his to his subordinates,  then he took a few goodies here and there on the side, started flirting with the cute, new receptionist, accepted gifts from customers that he shouldn't have —— basically, the guy started slacking.  But he was "in."  He had no fear of losing his job.

Then one day, the boss calls him in to his office and says, "Look Charlie, I know what you've been doing and you've got 90 days to get your act together or you're out."

Fear, shock, and shame rise up in Charlie's heart.  How could this happen to him?  Reality hits him like a sledgehammer.  He goes home depressed, gets drunk, staggers around for a day or two trying to fit this new reality on like a new starched and uncomfortable suit.  He has a choice.  He's got it in him —— always has.

So, after feeling sorry for himself, and going through the whole grieving process of losing his "prince" status, he decides to re—evaluate, re—group and get back to basics.

One of my favorite quotes is from Winston Churchill.

"The secret of success is being able to go from one failure to the next without losing enthusiasm."

And if anyone knew that secret it was Churchill!

Beth Barnat   11 10 06