A quiet gain for religious freedom

In this increasingly 24/7 world there is a small minority that is firmly 24/6——in other words they won't work one day of the week, will minimize their contact with the commercial world.  They are the Sabbath observers. 

Mainly religious Jews and Seventh Day Adventists who cannot work mainly on Saturday and religious Christians who observe Sabbath on Sunday, they have trouble dealing with those who don't understand their priorities.

Diversity defenders at best ignore them, usually scorn them.

Thus, confronted with a choice of working or participating on the Sabbath or being fired, thus suffering in some way, is a painful choice. Sometimes a compromise can be worked out for all concerned; for example, the SAT college entrance exam is offered on the Sundays after the regular Saturday dates. 

However  many employers and schools just ignore the Sabbath observer. Desperate, some go against deeply held convictions and do the forbidden Sabbath work. But now thanks to a self—described

middle American, mild—mannered, small—town library person _ I attribute to the Lord a great sense of humor for having picked me for this test

more can observe their religion without fear of retaliation or hardship.

When her small town library expanded to Sunday hours librarian Connie Rehm refused to work on her Sabbath and was therefore fired from her long time job, a job she loved.  And so this mild mannered librarian sued.  And won.  Thereby striking a blow for religious freedom for many.
 
Bravo to those little lady librarians who aren't always so quiet as they strike their blows for freedom one by one.
 
Ethel C. Fenig   11 17 06

In this increasingly 24/7 world there is a small minority that is firmly 24/6——in other words they won't work one day of the week, will minimize their contact with the commercial world.  They are the Sabbath observers. 

Mainly religious Jews and Seventh Day Adventists who cannot work mainly on Saturday and religious Christians who observe Sabbath on Sunday, they have trouble dealing with those who don't understand their priorities.

Diversity defenders at best ignore them, usually scorn them.

Thus, confronted with a choice of working or participating on the Sabbath or being fired, thus suffering in some way, is a painful choice. Sometimes a compromise can be worked out for all concerned; for example, the SAT college entrance exam is offered on the Sundays after the regular Saturday dates. 

However  many employers and schools just ignore the Sabbath observer. Desperate, some go against deeply held convictions and do the forbidden Sabbath work. But now thanks to a self—described

middle American, mild—mannered, small—town library person _ I attribute to the Lord a great sense of humor for having picked me for this test

more can observe their religion without fear of retaliation or hardship.

When her small town library expanded to Sunday hours librarian Connie Rehm refused to work on her Sabbath and was therefore fired from her long time job, a job she loved.  And so this mild mannered librarian sued.  And won.  Thereby striking a blow for religious freedom for many.
 
Bravo to those little lady librarians who aren't always so quiet as they strike their blows for freedom one by one.
 
Ethel C. Fenig   11 17 06